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Teachers’ Training, Class Size and Students’ Outcomes : Learning from Administrative Forecasting Mistakes

Author

Listed:
  • Pascal BRESSOUX

    (Crest)

  • Francis KRAMARZ

    (Crest)

  • Corinne PROST

    (Crest)

Abstract

This paper uses a feature of the French system in which some novice teachers start their jobsbefore receiving any training. Moreover, thanks to administrative mistakes in forecasting thenumber of teachers, trained and untrained novice teachers are similar in 1991. We show thatthey are assigned to similar classes. In addition, we show that the same sample can be used toestimate the causal effect of class size. Our findings are: (1) teachers’ training substantiallyimproves students’ test scores in mathematics, except for initially low-achieving students; (2) asmall class is beneficial to students, especially to low-achieving ones.

Suggested Citation

  • Pascal BRESSOUX & Francis KRAMARZ & Corinne PROST, 2008. "Teachers’ Training, Class Size and Students’ Outcomes : Learning from Administrative Forecasting Mistakes," Working Papers 2008-28, Center for Research in Economics and Statistics.
  • Handle: RePEc:crs:wpaper:2008-28
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Falch, Torberg & Johansen, Kåre & Strøm, Bjarne, 2009. "Teacher shortages and the business cycle," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(6), pages 648-658, December.
    2. Bonev, Petyo & Glachant, Matthieu & Söderberg, Magnus, 2018. "A Mechanism for Institutionalised Threat of Regulation: Evidence from the Swedish District Heating Market," Economics Working Paper Series 1805, University of St. Gallen, School of Economics and Political Science.
    3. Abou, Pokou Edouard, 2015. "Incidence du travail domestique, des caractéristiques de l’école et du ménage sur les résultats scolaires des filles en Côte d’Ivoire
      [Incidence of domestic work, school and household characteristi
      ," MPRA Paper 43976, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Tanoli, Mubashar Farooq, 2016. "Impact of Training and Mentoring on Employee Performance - Empirical analysis of Public and Private Universities’ staff members of Islamabad," MPRA Paper 74956, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 07 Nov 2016.
    5. Hideo Akabayashi & Ryosuke Nakamura, 2014. "Can Small Class Policy Close the Gap? An Empirical Analysis of Class Size Effects in Japan," The Japanese Economic Review, Japanese Economic Association, vol. 65(3), pages 253-281, September.
    6. Stephen Gibbons & Sandra McNally, 2013. "The Effects of Resources Across School Phases: A Summary of Recent Evidence," CEP Discussion Papers dp1226, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    7. Christopher Jepsen, 2015. "Class size: Does it matter for student achievement?," IZA World of Labor, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), pages 190-190, September.
    8. repec:zbw:espost:173233 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Alexis Le Chapelain, 2014. "Market for Education and Student Achievement," Sciences Po publications info:hdl:2441/1jgbspo1909, Sciences Po.
    10. Bouguen, Adrien, 2016. "Adjusting content to individual student needs: Further evidence from an in-service teacher training program," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 90-112.
    11. Hideo Akabayashi & Ryosuke Nakamura, 2012. "Can Small Class Policy Close The Gap? An Empirical Analysis Of Class Size Effects In Japan," Working Papers e51, Tokyo Center for Economic Research.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education

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