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The Effect of Extra Funding for Disadvantaged Pupils on Achievement

  • Leuven, Edwin

    (Department of Economics, University of Amsterdam, NWO Priority Program Scholar)

  • Lindahl, Mikael

    ()

    (Swedish Institute for Social Research, Stockholm University)

  • Oosterbeek, Hessel

    (Department of Economics, University of Amsterdam, NWO Priority Program Scholar)

  • Webbink, Dinand

    (NWO Priority Program Scholar and CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy)

This paper evaluates the effects of two subsidies targeted at disadvantaged pupils in the Netherlands. The first scheme gives primary schools with at least 70 percent minority pupils extra funding for personnel. The second scheme gives primary schools with at least 70 percent pupils from different disadvantaged groups extra funding for computers and software. The cutoffs at 70 percent provide a regression discontinuity design which we exploit in a local difference-in-differences framework. For both subsidies we find negative point estimates. For the personnel subsidy these are in most cases not significantly different from zero. For the computer subsidy we find more evidence of negative effects. We discuss several explanations for these counterintuitive results.

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Paper provided by Swedish Institute for Social Research in its series Working Paper Series with number 2/2004.

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Length: 36 pages
Date of creation: 07 Jun 2004
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:hhs:sofiwp:2004_002
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  1. Austan Goolsbee & Jonathan Guryan, 2002. "The Impact of Internet Subsidies in Public Schools," NBER Working Papers 9090, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Joshua Angrist & Victor Lavy, 1999. "New Evidence on Classroom Computers and Pupil Learning," NBER Working Papers 7424, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Alan Krueger, 2000. "Economic Considerations and Class Size," Working Papers 826, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
  4. Jonathan Guryan, 2001. "Does Money Matter? Regression-Discontinuity Estimates from Education Finance Reform in Massachusetts," NBER Working Papers 8269, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Hanushek, Eric A, 1986. "The Economics of Schooling: Production and Efficiency in Public Schools," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 24(3), pages 1141-77, September.
  6. Rouse, Cecilia Elena & Krueger, Alan B., 2004. "Putting computerized instruction to the test: a randomized evaluation of a "scientifically based" reading program," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 23(4), pages 323-338, August.
  7. van der Klaauw, Wilbert, 2008. "Breaking the link between poverty and low student achievement: An evaluation of Title I," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 142(2), pages 731-756, February.
  8. Card, David & Payne, A. Abigail, 2002. "School finance reform, the distribution of school spending, and the distribution of student test scores," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 83(1), pages 49-82, January.
  9. Papke, Leslie E., 2005. "The effects of spending on test pass rates: evidence from Michigan," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 89(5-6), pages 821-839, June.
  10. Edwin Leuven & Hessel Oosterbeek, 2002. "Evaluating the effect of tax deductions on training," Labor and Demography 0205001, EconWPA.
  11. Hanushek, Eric A., 2006. "School Resources," Handbook of the Economics of Education, Elsevier.
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