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Integrating computer-assisted learning into a regular curriculum: evidence from a randomised experiment in rural schools in Shaanxi

Author

Listed:
  • Di Mo
  • Linxiu Zhang
  • Renfu Luo
  • Qinghe Qu
  • Weiming Huang
  • Jiafu Wang
  • Yajie Qiao
  • Matthew Boswell
  • Scott Rozelle

Abstract

Recent attention has been placed on whether computer assisted learning (CAL) can effectively improve learning outcomes. However, the empirical evidence of its impact is mixed. Previous studies suggest that the lack of an impact in developed countries may be attributable to substitution of effort/time away from productive, in-school activities. However, there is little empirical evidence on how effective an in-school programme may be in developing countries. To explore the impact of an in-school CAL programme, we conducted a clustered randomised experiment involving over 4000 third and fifth grade students in 72 rural schools in China. Our results indicate that the in-school CAL programme has significantly improved the overall math scores by 0.16 standard deviations. Both the third graders and the fifth graders benefited from the programme.

Suggested Citation

  • Di Mo & Linxiu Zhang & Renfu Luo & Qinghe Qu & Weiming Huang & Jiafu Wang & Yajie Qiao & Matthew Boswell & Scott Rozelle, 2014. "Integrating computer-assisted learning into a regular curriculum: evidence from a randomised experiment in rural schools in Shaanxi," Journal of Development Effectiveness, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 6(3), pages 300-323, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:jdevef:v:6:y:2014:i:3:p:300-323
    DOI: 10.1080/19439342.2014.911770
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    Cited by:

    1. Karthik Muralidharan & Abhijeet Singh & Alejandro J. Ganimian, 2019. "Disrupting Education? Experimental Evidence on Technology-Aided Instruction in India," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 109(4), pages 1426-1460, April.
    2. Facundo Albornoz & María Victoria Anauati & Melina Furman & Mariana Luzuriaga & María Eugenia Podestá & Inés Taylor, 2017. "Training to teach science: experimental evidence from Argentina," Discussion Papers 2017-08, University of Nottingham, CREDIT.
    3. Fang Lai & Linxiu Zhang & Qinghe Qu & Xiao Hu & Yaojiang Shi & Matthew Boswell & Scott Rozelle, 2015. "Teaching the Language of Wider Communication, Minority Students, and Overall Educational Performance: Evidence from a Randomized Experiment in Qinghai Province, China," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 63(4), pages 753-776.
    4. George Bulman & Robert W. Fairlie, 2015. "Technology and Education: Computers, Software, and the Internet," CESifo Working Paper Series 5570, CESifo Group Munich.
    5. Yaojiang Shi & Yu Bai & Yanni Shen & Kaleigh Kenny & Scott Rozelle, 2016. "Effects of Parental Migration on Mental Health of Left-behind Children: Evidence from Northwestern China," China & World Economy, Institute of World Economics and Politics, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, vol. 24(3), pages 105-122, May.
    6. Marcel Fafchamps & Di Mo, 2018. "Peer effects in computer assisted learning: evidence from a randomized experiment," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 21(2), pages 355-382, June.

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