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Does computer-assisted learning improve learning outcomes? Evidence from a randomized experiment in migrant schools in Beijing

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  • Lai, Fang
  • Luo, Renfu
  • Zhang, Linxiu
  • Huang, Xinzhe
  • Rozelle, Scott

Abstract

The education of the disadvantaged population has been a long-standing challenge to education systems in both developed and developing countries. Although computer-assisted learning (CAL) has been considered one alternative to improve learning outcomes in a cost-effective way, the empirical evidence of its impacts on improving learning outcomes is mixed. This paper uses a randomized field experiment to explore the effects of CAL on student academic and non-academic outcomes for students in migrant schools in Beijing. Our results show that a remedial CAL program held out of regular school hours improved the student standardized math scores by 0.15 standard deviations and most of the program effect took place within 2 months after the start of the program. Students with less-educated parents benefited more from the program. Moreover, CAL also significantly increased the students’ interest in learning.

Suggested Citation

  • Lai, Fang & Luo, Renfu & Zhang, Linxiu & Huang, Xinzhe & Rozelle, Scott, 2015. "Does computer-assisted learning improve learning outcomes? Evidence from a randomized experiment in migrant schools in Beijing," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 34-48.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecoedu:v:47:y:2015:i:c:p:34-48
    DOI: 10.1016/j.econedurev.2015.03.005
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Ferman, Bruno & Finamor, Lucas & Lima, Lycia, 2019. "Are Public Schools Ready to Integrate Math Classes with Khan Academy?," MPRA Paper 94736, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Ian K. McDonough & Constant I. Tra, 2017. "The impact of computer-based tutorials on high school math proficiency," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 52(3), pages 1041-1063, May.
    3. Sabrin A. Beg & Adrienne M. Lucas & Waqas Halim & Umar Saif, 2019. "Beyond the Basics: Improving Post-Primary Content Delivery through Classroom Technology," NBER Working Papers 25704, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Yaojiang Shi & Yu Bai & Yanni Shen & Kaleigh Kenny & Scott Rozelle, 2016. "Effects of Parental Migration on Mental Health of Left-behind Children: Evidence from Northwestern China," China & World Economy, Institute of World Economics and Politics, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, vol. 24(3), pages 105-122, May.
    5. Yu Bai & Linxiu Zhang & Chengfang Liu & Yaojiang Shi & Di Mo & Scott Rozelle, 2018. "Effect of Parental Migration on the Academic Performance of Left Behind Children in North Western China," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 54(7), pages 1154-1170, July.
    6. Mohammad Khasawneh & Ahmad Bani Yaseen, 2017. "Critical success factors for e-learning satisfaction, Jordanian Universities’ experience," Journal of Business & Management (COES&RJ-JBM), , vol. 5(1), pages 56-69, January.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Education; Development; Computer-assisted learning; Random assignment; Test scores; China; Migration;

    JEL classification:

    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

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