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Differences in the distribution of high school achievement: The role of class-size and time-in-term

  • Corak, Miles
  • Lauzon, Darren

This paper adopts the technique of [DiNardo, Fortin and Lemieux (1996). Labour market institutions and the distribution of wages 1973-1992: A semiparametric approach. Econometrica, 64(5), 1001-1044.] to decompose differences in the distribution of PISA reading scores in Canada, and assesses the relative contribution of differences in the distribution of "class size" and time-in-term, other school factors and student background factors. Class size and time-in-term are both important school choice variables and we examine how provincial achievement differences would change if the Alberta distribution of class size and time-in-term prevailed in the other provinces. Results differ by province, and for provinces where mean achievement gaps would be lower, not all students would benefit.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economics of Education Review.

Volume (Year): 28 (2009)
Issue (Month): 2 (April)
Pages: 189-198

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Handle: RePEc:eee:ecoedu:v:28:y:2009:i:2:p:189-198
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/econedurev

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