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An Empirical Analysis of Employed and Unemployed Job Search Behavior

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  • David M. Blau

Abstract

This paper analyzes the job search activities of employed and unemployed job seekers using self-reported data from a 1980 survey. One novel finding from reduced form equations is that many searchers, both employed and unemployed, rejected at least one offer before accepting a job. The reduced form results are used to estimate reservation wages based on a fairly standard model of job search. Most of the job searchers accepted a job offer with a wage below the estimated reservation wage, suggesting that the model does not fit the data well.

Suggested Citation

  • David M. Blau, 1992. "An Empirical Analysis of Employed and Unemployed Job Search Behavior," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 45(4), pages 738-752, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:sae:ilrrev:v:45:y:1992:i:4:p:738-752
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    Cited by:

    1. Yannis M. Ioannides & Linda Datcher Loury, 2004. "Job Information Networks, Neighborhood Effects, and Inequality," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 42(4), pages 1056-1093, December.
    2. Patrick Bayer & Stephen L. Ross, 2006. "Identifying Individual and Group Effects in the Presence of Sorting: A Neighborhood Effects Application," Working papers 2006-13, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, revised Jan 2009.
    3. Bemjamin Villena-Roldan, 2009. "Aggregate Implications of Employer Search and Recruiting Selection," 2009 Meeting Papers 97, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    4. Meyer, Bruce D, 1996. "What Have We Learned from the Illinois Reemployment Bonus Experiment?," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 14(1), pages 26-51, January.
    5. Julie Hotchkiss, 1999. "The effect of transitional employment on search duration: A selectivity approach," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 27(1), pages 38-52, March.
    6. John T. Addison & Pedro Portugal, 2002. "Job search methods and outcomes," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 54(3), pages 505-533, July.
    7. Ari Hyytinen & Pekka Ilmakunnas, 2005. "Geneses of labour market turnover: Job search and entrepreneurial aspirations on-the-job," Labor and Demography 0501003, EconWPA.
    8. Linus Siming, 2014. "Your Former Employees Matter: Private Equity Firms and Their Financial Advisors," Review of Finance, European Finance Association, vol. 18(1), pages 109-146.
    9. Ari Hyytinen & Pekka Ilmakunnas, 2007. "Entrepreneurial Aspirations: Another Form of Job Search?," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 29(1), pages 63-80, June.
    10. Hyytinen, Ari & Ilmakunnas, Pekka, 2004. "Entrepreneurial Aspirations," Discussion Papers 890, The Research Institute of the Finnish Economy.

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