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Are Temporary Jobs a Port of Entry into Permanent Employment? Evidence from Matched Employer-Employee Data

Author

Listed:
  • Fabio Berton

    () (Department of Public Policy and Public Choice, University of Eastern Piedmont)

  • Francesco Devicienti

    () (Department of Economics and Public Finance "G. Prato", University of Torino)

  • Lia Pacelli

    () (Department of Economics and Public Finance "G. Prato", University of Torino)

Abstract

Are temporary jobs a port of entry into permanent employment? In this paper we argue that the answer crucially depends on the type of temporary contracts being considered, as the different contracts observed in practice are typically characterized by varying combinations of training, tax-incentives and EPL provisions. We base our empirical evidence on a longitudinal sample of labour market entrants in Italy, a country where a large number of temporary contracts coexist with a relatively high employment protection for standard employees. We estimate dynamic multinomial logit models with fixed effects, to allow for non-random sorting of workers into the different types of contracts. We show that the transition to permanent employment is more likely for individuals holding any type of temporary contracts than for the unemployed, thus broadly confirming the existence of port-of-entry effects. Yet, not all temporary contracts are the same: training contracts are the best port of entry, while freelance contracts are the worst. We also show that temporary contracts are generally a port-of-entry into a permanent position within the same employer, but not across firms, implying that little general-purpose training is gained while on temporary jobs. Moreover, the time needed for an internal transformation from a temporary to a permanent position appears rather long, suggesting that firms are likely to use (a sequence of) temporary contracts as a cost-reduction strategy, rather than as a screening device for newly hired workers.

Suggested Citation

  • Fabio Berton & Francesco Devicienti & Lia Pacelli, 2009. "Are Temporary Jobs a Port of Entry into Permanent Employment? Evidence from Matched Employer-Employee Data," Working papers 06, Former Department of Economics and Public Finance "G. Prato", University of Torino.
  • Handle: RePEc:tur:wpaper:06
    as

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    File URL: http://www.biblioecon.unito.it/biblioservizi/RePEc/tur/wpaper/n6.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    Cited by:

    1. Emanuele Ciani & Guido de Blasio, 2015. "Getting stable: an evaluation of the incentives for permanent contracts in Italy," IZA Journal of European Labor Studies, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 4(1), pages 1-29, December.
    2. Gunther Tichy, 2014. "Flexicurity – A Concept Doomed to Failure," WIFO Monatsberichte (monthly reports), WIFO, vol. 87(8), pages 537-553, August.
    3. Giovanni S.F. Bruno & Floro Ernesto Caroleo & Orietta Dessy, 2014. "Temporary Contracts and Young Workers’ Job Satisfaction in Italy," AIEL Series in Labour Economics,in: Dario Sciulli & Miguel Ángel Malo (ed.), Disadvantaged Workers, edition 1, chapter 6, pages 95-120 AIEL - Associazione Italiana Economisti del Lavoro.
    4. Tealdi, Cristina, 2011. "Typical and atypical employment contracts: the case of Italy," MPRA Paper 39456, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Andrea F. Presbitero & Matteo G. Richiardi & Alessia A. Amighini, 2015. "Is labor flexibility a substitute to offshoring? Evidence from Italian manufacturing," International Economics, CEPII research center, issue 142, pages 81-93.
    6. Isabella David, 2009. "Composition Bias and Italian Wage Rigidities over the Business Cycle," LABORatorio R. Revelli Working Papers Series 92, LABORatorio R. Revelli, Centre for Employment Studies.
    7. Giovanni S.F. Bruno & Floro E. Caroleo & Orietta Dessy, 2013. "Stepping stones versus dead end jobs: exits from temporary contracts in Italy after the 2003 reform," Rivista Internazionale di Scienze Sociali, Vita e Pensiero, Pubblicazioni dell'Universita' Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, vol. 121(1), pages 31-62.
    8. Francesco Devicienti & Paolo Naticchioni & Andrea Ricci, 2018. "Temporary Employment, Demand Volatility, and Unions: Firm-Level Evidence," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 71(1), pages 174-207, January.
    9. Lorenzo Cappellari & Carlo Dell’Aringa & Marco Leonardi, 2012. "Temporary Employment in Italy," ifo DICE Report, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 10(1), pages 55-62, 04.
    10. Picchio, Matteo & Staffolani, Stefano, 2013. "Does Apprenticeship Improve Job Opportunities? A Regression Discontinuity Approach," IZA Discussion Papers 7719, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    11. repec:spr:izalbr:v:6:y:2017:i:1:d:10.1186_s40172-017-0054-3 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Stefano Sacchi & Patrik Vesan, 2011. "Interpreting employment policy change in Italy since the 1990s: nature and dynamics," Carlo Alberto Notebooks 228, Collegio Carlo Alberto.
    13. Bruno Contini, 2012. "Youth employment in Europe: do institutions and social capital explain better than mainstream economics?," European Journal of Comparative Economics, Cattaneo University (LIUC), vol. 9(2), pages 247-277, August.
    14. Bachmann, Ronald & Beimann, Boris & Bredtmann, Julia & David, Peggy & Ehlert, Christoph & Kassenböhmer, Sonja & Schaffner, Sandra & Siemers, Lars, 2011. "Studies on flexicurity Lot 1: Study on various aspects of labour market performance using micro data from the European Union statistics on income and living conditions (EU-SILC). Contract No. VC/2010/," RWI Projektberichte, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, number 72620, March.
    15. Hélène Couprie & Xavier Joutard, 2017. "Atypical Employment and Prospects of the Youth on the Labor Market in a Crisis Context," THEMA Working Papers 2017-08, THEMA (THéorie Economique, Modélisation et Applications), Université de Cergy-Pontoise.
    16. Gabriella Berloffa & Francesca Modena & Paola Villa, 2011. "Inequality of opportunity for young people in Italy: Understanding the role of circumstances," Working Papers 241, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    temporary jobs; port of entry; matched employer-employee data; dynamic multinomial logit models; state dependence; fixed effects;

    JEL classification:

    • J41 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Labor Contracts
    • J63 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Turnover; Vacancies; Layoffs

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