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Atypical Employment and Prospects of the Youth on the Labor Market in a Crisis Context

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  • Hélène Couprie
  • Xavier Joutard

    () (Université de Cergy-Pontoise, THEMA)

Abstract

We compare the entrance trajectories of two cohorts of young people into the labor market seven years after leaving the French educational system. We focus our analysis on the employment consequences of atypical employment spells, i.e. part time and temporary work contracts using a Markovian model of labor market transitions with fixed effects. We estimate the stepping-stone effect of atypical employment towards the employment norm of full-time open-ended contract on four gender-education segments of the population. We then disentangle the trend from the Great Recession effect using a dif-in-dif approach. This brings new insights about the redistributive impact of an economic crisis accross gender. Unintended positive effects of the crisis on the trajectory of men transiting through temporary employment spells (external flexibility leverage) is brought to light. Women’s chances to reach the employment norm through transitory spells of part-time work (internal flexibility leverage) appear to be affected negatively by the crisis.

Suggested Citation

  • Hélène Couprie & Xavier Joutard, 2017. "Atypical Employment and Prospects of the Youth on the Labor Market in a Crisis Context," THEMA Working Papers 2017-08, THEMA (THéorie Economique, Modélisation et Applications), Université de Cergy-Pontoise.
  • Handle: RePEc:ema:worpap:2017-08
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    File URL: http://thema.u-cergy.fr/IMG/pdf/2017-08.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. repec:bfr:quarte:2016:45:03 is not listed on IDEAS
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    3. repec:bfr:quarte:2016:45:01 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. repec:bfr:quarte:2017:45:02 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. repec:bfr:quarte:2017:45:04 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. C. Berson & C. Malgouyres & S. Ray, 2017. "The labour market: institutions and reforms Summary of the third Labour Market Conference held in Aix-en-Provence on 1 and 2 December 2016 by the Aix-Marseille School of Economics and the Banque de Fr," Quarterly selection of articles - Bulletin de la Banque de France, Banque de France, issue 45, pages 45-52, Spring.
    7. repec:bfr:quarte:2016:45:05 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. repec:eso:journl:v:48:y:2017:i:4:p:463-488 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. repec:bfr:quarte:2017:45:01 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. repec:bfr:quarte:2017:45:06 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. repec:bfr:quarte:2017:45:03 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. repec:bfr:quarte:2016:45:04 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. repec:bfr:quarte:2016:45:02 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    school-to-work transition; crisis; gender; stepping-stone;

    JEL classification:

    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion
    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search

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