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The Wage Effects of Cumulative Job Mobility

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  • Kristen Keith
  • Abagail McWilliams

Abstract

This analysis of data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth shows that cumulative job mobility had statistically significant effects on wages in the years 1979–88. The direction of the wage effects (positive or negative) and their magnitude varied depending on the type of cumulative mobility examined: employee-initiated versus employer-initiated separations, economic versus family-related quits, layoffs versus discharges. The results also indicate that although men and women had different mobility histories—men, for example, had been discharged more often than women, and women had quit for family-related reasons more often than men—the wage effects of each type of cumulative mobility (economic quits, family-related quits, layoffs, and discharges) were similar for men and women.

Suggested Citation

  • Kristen Keith & Abagail McWilliams, 1995. "The Wage Effects of Cumulative Job Mobility," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 49(1), pages 121-137, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:sae:ilrrev:v:49:y:1995:i:1:p:121-137
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    Cited by:

    1. Mal'tseva Inna, 2005. "Gender differences in occupational mobility and segregation at the labor market: The case of Russian economy," EERC Working Paper Series 05-11e, EERC Research Network, Russia and CIS.
    2. Linda Datcher Loury, 2004. "Job Tenure and Personal Contacts: Good Matches or Limited Choices?," Discussion Papers Series, Department of Economics, Tufts University 0417, Department of Economics, Tufts University.
    3. Miri Endeweld, 2018. "On Job Mobility And Earnings Growth," Israel Economic Review, Bank of Israel, vol. 16(2), pages 37-62.
    4. repec:boi:isrerv:v:16:y:2019:i:2:p:37-62 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Değer Eryar & Hasan Tekgüç, 2014. "Gender Effect in Explaining Mobility Patterns in the Labor Market: A Case Study of Turkey," The Developing Economies, Institute of Developing Economies, vol. 52(4), pages 322-350, December.
    6. Royalty, Anne Beeson, 1998. "Job-to-Job and Job-to-Nonemployment Turnover by Gender and Education Level," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 16(2), pages 392-443, April.
    7. Bäker, Agnes, 2015. "Non-tenured post-doctoral researchers’ job mobility and research output: An analysis of the role of research discipline, department size, and coauthors," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 44(3), pages 634-650.
    8. Joyce Burnette, 2011. "The Emergence of Wage Discrimination in U.S. Manufacturing," Working Papers 11-18, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
    9. Amuedo-Dorantes, Catalina & Serrano-Padial, Ricardo, 2007. "Wage Growth Implications of Fixed-Term Employment: An Analysis by Contract Duration and Job Mobility," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(5), pages 829-847, October.
    10. Johannes Wieschke, 2018. "Frequency of employer changes and their financial return: gender differences amongst German university graduates," Journal for Labour Market Research, Springer;Institute for Employment Research/ Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), vol. 52(1), pages 1-13, December.
    11. Reichelt, Malte & Abraham, Martin, 2015. "Occupational and regional mobility as substitutes : a new approach to understanding job changes and wage inequality," IAB Discussion Paper 201514, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
    12. Jin Liu & Zhaohui Yin & Wenjing Lyu & Songyue Lin, 2019. "Does Money Accelerate Faculty Mobility? Survey Findings from 11 Research Universities in China," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(24), pages 1-15, December.
    13. Karen L. Webber & Samantha M. Rogers, 2018. "Gender Differences in Faculty Member Job Satisfaction: Equity Forestalled?," Research in Higher Education, Springer;Association for Institutional Research, vol. 59(8), pages 1105-1132, December.
    14. Debra A. Barbezat & James W. Hughes, 2001. "The Effect Of Job Mobility On Academic Salaries," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 19(4), pages 409-423, October.
    15. Bernt Bratsberg & James F. Ragan & Zafar M. Nasir, 2002. "The Effect of Naturalization on Wage Growth: A Panel Study of Young Male Immigrants," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 20(3), pages 568-597, July.
    16. Linda Datcher Loury, 2006. "Some Contacts Are More Equal than Others: Informal Networks, Job Tenure, and Wages," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 24(2), pages 299-318, April.
    17. Abhishek Shukla & Rajeev Srivastava, 2016. "Influence of ethical ideology and socio-demographic characteristics on turnover intention: A study of retail industry in India," Cogent Business & Management, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 3(1), pages 1238334-123, December.
    18. Maria A. Davia, 2010. "Job Mobility And Wage Growth At The Beginning Of The Professional Career In Spain," Revista de Economia Aplicada, Universidad de Zaragoza, Departamento de Estructura Economica y Economia Publica, vol. 18(1), pages 5-34, Spring.

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