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Determinants of Job Turnover Intentions : Evidence from Singapore

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  • Xiaolin Xing

    (SCAPE)

  • Zhenlin Yang

Abstract

This paper explores both observable and unobservable variables that would affect employed workers decisions on job change. We find that age, job satisfaction, satisfaction with working environment or job security, and firm size are among the major factors determining workers intentions of job-to-job mobility. Younger workers and workers in smaller firms are more likely to look for other jobs. We also find that men are more likely to consider a change in job than women, but when actually looking for another job is concerned, men and women do not differ. Furthermore, monthly income and working sector contribute significantly to looking for other jobs.

Suggested Citation

  • Xiaolin Xing & Zhenlin Yang, 2005. "Determinants of Job Turnover Intentions : Evidence from Singapore," Labor Economics Working Papers 22588, East Asian Bureau of Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:eab:laborw:22588
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Voluntary job-to-job mobility; Job satisfaction; Logistic regression model;

    JEL classification:

    • J60 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - General
    • J63 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Turnover; Vacancies; Layoffs
    • C25 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Discrete Regression and Qualitative Choice Models; Discrete Regressors; Proportions; Probabilities

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