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Job Turnover and the Returns to Seniority


  • Dostie, Benoit


In this paper, we match firm data to individual work history files in order to simultaneously estimate the wage and employment duration processes of a longitudinal sample of two million French workers employed in roughly one million firms and followed over twenty years. The particular structure of the data set allows us to distinguish between the impact of job search and labor demand indicators on wages and employment at the job level. The model allows for correlated individual and job unobserved heterogeneity. Controlling for job matching, we find that returns to seniority are close to zero
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Suggested Citation

  • Dostie, Benoit, 2005. "Job Turnover and the Returns to Seniority," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 23, pages 192-199, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:bes:jnlbes:v:23:y:2005:p:192-199

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    7. Julie L. Hotchkiss & M. Melinda Pitts & John C. Robertson, 2003. "The ups and downs of jobs in Georgia: what can we learn about employment dynamics from state administrative data?," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2003-38, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
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    Cited by:

    1. Guillaume Horny & Rute Mendes & Gerard J. van den Berg, 2012. "Job Durations With Worker- and Firm-Specific Effects: MCMC Estimation With Longitudinal Employer--Employee Data," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 30(3), pages 468-480, March.
    2. Xiaolin Xing & Zhenlin Yang, 2005. "Determinants of Job Turnover Intentions: Evidence from Singapore," SCAPE Policy Research Working Paper Series 0515, National University of Singapore, Department of Economics, SCAPE.
    3. repec:bla:manchs:v:85:y:2017:i:3:p:295-319 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Michele Battisti, 2016. "Individual Wage Growth: The Role of Industry Experience," Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 55(1), pages 40-70, January.
    5. repec:lan:wpaper:4796 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Bertoni, Marco & Brunello, Giorgio & Rocco, Lorenzo, 2015. "Selection and the age – productivity profile. Evidence from chess players," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 110(C), pages 45-58.
    7. Bernhard Boockmann & Susanne Steffes, 2010. "Workers, Firms, or Institutions: What Determines Job Duration for Male Employees in Germany?," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 64(1), pages 109-127, October.
    8. Woodcock Simon D, 2010. "Heterogeneity and Learning in Labor Markets," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 10(1), pages 1-69, September.
    9. Woodcock, Simon D., 2015. "Match effects," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(1), pages 100-121.
    10. V Maltezou & G Johnes, 2008. "It''S Been A Long Time: A Comparative Analysis Of Job Duration In Banking," Working Papers 596221, Lancaster University Management School, Economics Department.
    11. repec:spr:izalbr:v:6:y:2017:i:1:d:10.1186_s40172-017-0057-0 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. repec:lan:wpaper:4362 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Boockmann, Bernhard & Steffes, Susanne, 2007. "Seniority and Job Stability: A Quantile Regression Approach Using Matched Employer-Employee Data," ZEW Discussion Papers 07-014, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    14. Kyoji Fukao & Ryo Kambayashi & Daiji Kawaguchi & Hyeog Ug Kwon & Young Gak Kim & Izumi Yokoyama, 2006. "Deferred Compensation: Evidence from Employer-Employee Matched Data from Japan," Hi-Stat Discussion Paper Series d06-187, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    15. Sullivan, Paul, 2010. "Empirical evidence on occupation and industry specific human capital," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(3), pages 567-580, June.
    16. Paul Hek & Daniel Vuuren, 2011. "Are older workers overpaid? A literature review," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 18(4), pages 436-460, August.
    17. Matthias Benz & Bruno S. Frey, 2006. "Towards a Constitutional Theory of Corporate Governance," IEW - Working Papers 304, Institute for Empirical Research in Economics - University of Zurich.
    18. repec:lan:wpaper:4491 is not listed on IDEAS
    19. Thomas Cornelißen & Olaf Hübler, 2011. "Unobserved Individual and Firm Heterogeneity in Wage and Job‐Duration Functions: Evidence from German Linked Employer–Employee Data," German Economic Review, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 12(4), pages 469-489, November.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C33 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • J30 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - General
    • J41 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Labor Contracts


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