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Job mobility in Portugal: a Bayesian study with matched worker-firm data

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Listed:
  • Guillaume Horny
  • Rute Mendes
  • Gerard J. Van den Berg

Abstract

We study job mobility using a multivariate hazard model in discrete time. It involves two correlated random effects, one at the firm level and another at the worker level. Bayesian estimates are based on a Portuguese matched employer-employee dataset. Our results confirm the importance of unobserved heterogeneity at the individual level and at the firm level. Furthermore, the model performs better when allowing for an assortative matching mecanism in terms of employers’ and employees’ unobservables.

Suggested Citation

  • Guillaume Horny & Rute Mendes & Gerard J. Van den Berg, 2006. "Job mobility in Portugal: a Bayesian study with matched worker-firm data," Working Papers of BETA 2006-32, Bureau d'Economie Théorique et Appliquée, UDS, Strasbourg.
  • Handle: RePEc:ulp:sbbeta:2006-32
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. L. Biggeri & M. Bini & L. Grilli, 2001. "The transition from university to work: a multilevel approach to the analysis of the time to obtain the first job," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 164(2), pages 293-305.
    2. Samuel Manda & Renate Meyer, 2005. "Age at first marriage in Malawi: a Bayesian multilevel analysis using a discrete time-to-event model," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 168(2), pages 439-455.
    3. John M. Abowd & Francis Kramarz & Sébastien Roux, 2006. "Wages, Mobility and Firm Performance: Advantages and Insights from Using Matched Worker-Firm Data," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 116(512), pages 245-285, June.
    4. Mendes, Rute & van den Berg, Gerard J. & Lindeboom, Maarten, 2010. "An empirical assessment of assortative matching in the labor market," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(6), pages 919-929, December.
    5. Guillaume Horny & Dragana Djurdjevic & Bernhard Boockmann & François Laisney, 2008. "Bayesian Estimation of Cox Models with Non-nested Random Effects: an Application to the Ratification Of ILO Conventions by Developing Countries," Annals of Economics and Statistics, GENES, issue 89, pages 193-214.
    6. Moshe Buchinsky & Denis Fougère & Francis Kramarz & Rusty Tchernis, 2002. "Interfirm Mobility, Wages and the Returns to Seniority and Experience in the U.S," Working Papers 2002-29, Center for Research in Economics and Statistics.
    7. D. Firth & C. Payne & J. Payne, 1999. "Efficacy of programmes for the unemployed: discrete time modelling of duration data from a matched-comparison study," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 162(1), pages 111-120.
    8. William R. Johnson, 1978. "A Theory of Job Shopping," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 92(2), pages 261-277.
    9. Leonardo Grilli, 2005. "The random-effects proportional hazards model with grouped survival data: a comparison between the grouped continuous and continuation ratio versions," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 168(1), pages 83-94.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Job transitions; assortative matching; Gibbs sampling; frailties; dynamic models; matched employer-employee data.;

    JEL classification:

    • C11 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Bayesian Analysis: General
    • C15 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Statistical Simulation Methods: General
    • C41 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods: Special Topics - - - Duration Analysis; Optimal Timing Strategies
    • J20 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - General
    • J41 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Labor Contracts
    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion

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