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Industry shutdown rates and permanent layoffs: evidence from firm-worker matched data

Author

Listed:
  • Kim P. Huynh

    () (Bank of Canada)

  • Yuri Ostrovsky

    () (Statistics Canada)

  • Robert J. Petrunia

    () (Lakehead University)

  • Marcel C. Voia

    () (Carleton University)

Abstract

Abstract Firm shutdown creates a turbulent situation for workers as it leads directly to layoffs for its workers. An additional consideration is whether a firm’s shutdown within an industry creates turbulence for workers at other continuing firms. Using data drawn from the Longitudinal Worker File, a Canadian firm-worker matched employment database, we investigate the impact of industry shutdown rates on workers at continuing firm. This paper exploits variation in shutdown rates across industries and within an industry over time to explain the rate of permanent layoffs and the growth of workers’ earnings. We find an increase in industry shutdown rates increases the probability of permanent layoffs and decreases earnings growth for workers at continuing firms.

Suggested Citation

  • Kim P. Huynh & Yuri Ostrovsky & Robert J. Petrunia & Marcel C. Voia, 2017. "Industry shutdown rates and permanent layoffs: evidence from firm-worker matched data," IZA Journal of Labor Economics, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 6(1), pages 1-31, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:izalbr:v:6:y:2017:i:1:d:10.1186_s40172-017-0057-0
    DOI: 10.1186/s40172-017-0057-0
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Anja Deelen & Marloes de Graaf-Zijl & Wiljan van den Berge, 2018. "Labour market effects of job displacement for prime-age and older workers," IZA Journal of Labor Economics, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 7(1), pages 1-30, December.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Worker separation; Firm survival; Selection;

    JEL classification:

    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • J63 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Turnover; Vacancies; Layoffs
    • C35 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Discrete Regression and Qualitative Choice Models; Discrete Regressors; Proportions

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