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Anticipated and Unanticipated Wage Changes, Wage Risk, and Intertemporal Labor Supply

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  • Luigi Pistaferri

    (Stanford University and Center for Economic Policy Research)

Abstract

In this article, I estimate how labor supply responds to anticipated wage growth, unanticipated wage growth, and wage risk using the 198993 panel section of the Bank of Italy Survey of Households' Income and Wealth (SHIW), which collects individual expectations of future wages. The use of subjective expectations has several advantages. First, they provide information on the evolution and riskiness of future wages that the econometrician may never hope to observe. Moreover, this avoids the need for specifying instruments for the growth rate of wages. Finally, forecast errors can be directly controlled for, thus avoiding inconsistency in short panels.

Suggested Citation

  • Luigi Pistaferri, 2003. "Anticipated and Unanticipated Wage Changes, Wage Risk, and Intertemporal Labor Supply," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 21(3), pages 729-754, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:jlabec:v:21:y:2003:i:3:p:729-728
    DOI: 10.1086/374965
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D91 - Microeconomics - - Micro-Based Behavioral Economics - - - Role and Effects of Psychological, Emotional, Social, and Cognitive Factors on Decision Making
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply

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