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Estimating Intertemporal Labour Supply Elasticities Using Structural Models

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  • Bover, Olympia

Abstract

In this paper, the author proposes empirical models where both the intertemporal substitution elasticity and the elasticities measuring the impact of different wage profiles are estimated taking into account the restrictions derived from utility maximization. She considers models assuming a Stone Geary utility function and also a constant elasticity of substitution across periods function. The data used are a sample of men from the Michigan Panel of Income Dynamics. Her estimates support the low intertemporal substitution elasticity found in previous studies. The estimates for the uncompensated elasticities are also small. Copyright 1989 by Royal Economic Society.

Suggested Citation

  • Bover, Olympia, 1989. "Estimating Intertemporal Labour Supply Elasticities Using Structural Models," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 99(398), pages 1026-1039, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecj:econjl:v:99:y:1989:i:398:p:1026-39
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    Cited by:

    1. Donni, Olivier, 2007. "On the identification of Frisch labor supplies," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 95(1), pages 1-6, April.
    2. Blundell, Richard & Macurdy, Thomas, 1999. "Labor supply: A review of alternative approaches," Handbook of Labor Economics,in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 27, pages 1559-1695 Elsevier.
    3. Richard Blundell, 1993. "Offre de travail et fiscalité : une revue de la littérature," Économie et Prévision, Programme National Persée, vol. 108(2), pages 1-18.
    4. Luigi Pistaferri, 2003. "Anticipated and Unanticipated Wage Changes, Wage Risk, and Intertemporal Labor Supply," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 21(3), pages 729-754, July.
    5. Steven J. Haider & David S. Loughran, 2003. "How Important Are Wages to the Elderly? Evidence from the New Beneficiary Data System and the Social Security Earnings Test," Working Papers wp049, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center.
    6. Michael P. Keane, 2011. "Labor Supply and Taxes: A Survey," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 49(4), pages 961-1075, December.
    7. David Cesarini & Erik Lindqvist & Matthew J. Notowidigdo & Robert Östling, 2017. "The Effect of Wealth on Individual and Household Labor Supply: Evidence from Swedish Lotteries," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 107(12), pages 3917-3946, December.
    8. Manuel Arellano & Olympia Bover, 1990. "La econometría de datos de panel," Investigaciones Economicas, Fundación SEPI, vol. 14(1), pages 3-45, January.
    9. Keane, Michael, 2010. "The Tax-Transfer System and Labour Supply," MPRA Paper 55167, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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