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Training systems and labor mobility: A comparison between Germany and Sweden

  • Korpi, Tomas
  • Mertens, Antje
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    The impact of general and specific training on income and mobility is an important issue for the discussion around human capital as well as the design of educational systems. Using data from two retrospective life-history surveys this paper examines the impact of more general school-based vocational training (Sweden) and more specific apprenticeship training (Germany) on inter-firm, inter-occupational, and inter-industrial mobility. The results show that workers with a school-based vocational degree move more frequently between occupations, while no difference in firm and industrial mobility can be discerned.

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    File URL: http://econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/65346/1/726364967.pdf
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    Paper provided by Humboldt University of Berlin, Interdisciplinary Research Project 373: Quantification and Simulation of Economic Processes in its series SFB 373 Discussion Papers with number 2002,19.

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    Date of creation: 2002
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    Handle: RePEc:zbw:sfb373:200219
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    2. Thomas A. DiPrete, 2001. "Life Course Risks, Mobility Regimes, and Mobility Consequences: A Comparison of Sweden, Germany and the U.S," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 255, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
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    6. Euwals, Rob & Winkelmann, Rainer, 2001. "Why Do Firms Train? Empirical Evidence on the First Labour Market Outcomes of Graduated Apprentices," IZA Discussion Papers 319, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
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    9. Acemoglu, D. & Pischki, J.S., 1996. "Why Do Firms Train? Theory and Evidence," Working papers 96-7, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics.
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    11. Burda, Michael C. & Mertens, Antje, 1999. "Estimating wage losses of displaced workers in Germany," SFB 373 Discussion Papers 1999,35, Humboldt University of Berlin, Interdisciplinary Research Project 373: Quantification and Simulation of Economic Processes.
    12. Parsons, Donald O, 1972. "Specific Human Capital: An Application to Quit Rates and Layoff Rates," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 80(6), pages 1120-43, Nov.-Dec..
    13. Rainer Winkelmann, 1997. "How young workers get their training: A survey of Germany versus the United States," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 10(2), pages 159-170.
    14. A. Werwatz, 1997. "Mobility after Apprenticeship- How effective is the German apprenticeship system?," SFB 373 Discussion Papers 1997,75, Humboldt University of Berlin, Interdisciplinary Research Project 373: Quantification and Simulation of Economic Processes.
    15. Jacob A. Mincer, 1974. "Introduction to "Schooling, Experience, and Earnings"," NBER Chapters, in: Schooling, Experience, and Earnings, pages 1-4 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    19. Jacob A. Mincer, 1974. "Schooling, Experience, and Earnings," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number minc74-1.
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