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Favorable Self-Selection and the Internal Migration of Young White Males in the United States

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  • Paul E. Gabriel
  • Susanne Schmitz

Abstract

This study offers an alternative empirical technique to test whether the favorable self-selection hypothesis applies to internal migrants in the United States. Our empirical specification attempts to determine if prospective migrants possess unobserved traits such as higher ability or motivation which influence their earnings potential relative to nonmigrants. Using NLSY data for 1985 through 1991, we find some support for the favorable self-selection hypothesis for white males who move from one SMSA to another. Prior to their move, prospective migrants enjoy a consistent advantage in annual wage and salary income relative to nonmigrants with similar earnings-related characteristics.

Suggested Citation

  • Paul E. Gabriel & Susanne Schmitz, 1995. "Favorable Self-Selection and the Internal Migration of Young White Males in the United States," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 30(3), pages 460-471.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwp:jhriss:v:30:y:1995:i:3:p:460-471
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    Cited by:

    1. Chung Choe & E. LaBrent Chrite, 2014. "Internal Migration of Blacks in South Africa: An Application of the Roy Model," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 82(1), pages 81-98, March.
    2. John C. Ham & Xianghong Li & Patricia B. Reagan, 2004. "Propensity Score Matching, a Distance-Based Measure of Migration, and the Wage Growth of Young Men," IEPR Working Papers 05.13, Institute of Economic Policy Research (IEPR).
    3. Venhorst, V. & Cörvers, F., 2015. "Entry into working life: Spatial mobility and the job match quality of higher-educated graduates," ROA Research Memorandum 003, Maastricht University, Research Centre for Education and the Labour Market (ROA).
    4. Timothy J. Halliday & Michael Kimmitt, 2007. "Selective Migration and Health," Working Papers 200720, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Economics.
    5. Julie L. Hotchkiss & M. Melinda Pitts & John C. Robertson, 2008. "The Push-Pull Effects of the Information Technology Boom and Bust," Economic Development Quarterly, , vol. 22(3), pages 200-212, August.
    6. Barry R. Chiswick, 1999. "Are Immigrants Favorably Self-Selected? An Economic Analysis," University of Chicago - George G. Stigler Center for Study of Economy and State 147, Chicago - Center for Study of Economy and State.
    7. Caliendo, Marco & Cobb-Clark, Deborah A. & Hennecke, Juliane & Uhlendorff, Arne, 2015. "Job Search, Locus of Control, and Internal Migration," IZA Discussion Papers 9600, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    8. Boheim, Rene & Taylor, Mark P., 2007. "From the dark end of the street to the bright side of the road? The wage returns to migration in Britain," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(1), pages 99-117, January.
    9. Philippe Lemistre & Nicolas Moreau, 2009. "Spatial Mobility And Returns To Education: Some Evidence From A Sample Of French Youth," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 49(1), pages 149-176.
    10. Dijk, J. van & Broersma, L. & Edzes, A.J.E. & Venhorst, V.A, 2011. "Brain drain of brain gain? Hoger opgeleiden in grote steden in Nederland," Research Reports vavenhorst, University of Groningen, Urban and Regional Studies Institute (URSI).
    11. Ham, John C. & Li, Xianghong & Reagan, Patricia B., 2011. "Matching and semi-parametric IV estimation, a distance-based measure of migration, and the wages of young men," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 161(2), pages 208-227, April.
    12. Consuelo Abellán-Colodrón, 1998. "Ganancia salarial esperada como determinante de la decisión individual de emigrar," Investigaciones Economicas, Fundación SEPI, vol. 22(1), pages 93-117, January.
    13. Bohyun Jang & John Casterline & Anastasia Snyder, 2014. "Migration and marriage: Modeling the joint process," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 30(47), pages 1339-1366, April.
    14. Marie-Benoît Magrini & Philippe Lemistre, 2008. "La mobilité géographique des jeunes ouvriers et employés est-elle rentable ?," Économie et Prévision, Programme National Persée, vol. 185(4), pages 63-88.
    15. Tinghög, Petter & Carstensen, John & Kaati, Gunnar & Edvinsson, Sören & Sjöström, Michael & Bygren, Lars Olov, 2011. "Migration and mortality trajectories: A study of individuals born in the rural community of Överkalix, Sweden," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 73(5), pages 744-751, September.
    16. Anders Boman, 2011. "Does migration pay? Earnings effects of geographic mobility following job displacement," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 24(4), pages 1369-1384, October.
    17. Boman, Anders, 2012. "Employment effects of extended geographic scope in job search," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(5), pages 643-652.
    18. Jeffrey J. Yankow, 2003. "Migration, Job Change, and Wage Growth: A New Perspective on the Pecuniary Return to Geographic Mobility," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 43(3), pages 483-516.
    19. Robert A. Nakosteen & Olle Westerlund & Michael Zimmer, 2008. "Migration And Self-Selection: Measured Earnings And Latent Characteristics," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 48(4), pages 769-788.
    20. Shilpi, Forhad & Sangraula, Prem & Li, Yue, 2014. "Voting with their feet ? access to infrastructure and migration in Nepal," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7047, The World Bank.
    21. Thomas Liebig & Alfonso Sousa-Poza, 2003. "How does income inequality influence international migration?," ERSA conference papers ersa03p472, European Regional Science Association.

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