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Incomplete Compensation and Migration Behavior: Has Anything Changed Between 1990 and 2000?

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  • Clark, David E.
  • Herrin, William E.
  • Knapp, Thomas A.
  • White, Nancy E.

Abstract

Spatial equilibrium models rely on migration to arbitrage away differences in utility across locations net of moving costs, where remaining differences in wages and rents reflect the compensating differentials related to site-specific amenities. Recent refinements to the spatial equilibrium model focus upon the prospect of disequilibrium in amenity markets. Amenity market disequilibrium implies over- or under-compensation (incomplete compensation) across some locations, which suggests a role for these factors in subsequent migration. This paper follows the theoretical and empirical approach of Clark, Herrin, Knapp, and White (2003). An intercity wage regression is estimated where fixed effects capture the impact of site characteristics on wages. We then regress the fixed effects on a comprehensive vector of site attributes, where the residuals capture incomplete compensation in wages. The derived measures of incomplete compensation are included in a binary logit model of migration. The results provide further evidence that incomplete compensation for site characteristics is a significant factor in migration decisions, and the findings are consistent with tendencies toward spatial equilibrium.

Suggested Citation

  • Clark, David E. & Herrin, William E. & Knapp, Thomas A. & White, Nancy E., 2006. "Incomplete Compensation and Migration Behavior: Has Anything Changed Between 1990 and 2000?," Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy, Mid-Continent Regional Science Association, vol. 36(2).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:jrapmc:132325
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Graves, Philip E. & Linneman, Peter D., 1979. "Household migration: Theoretical and empirical results," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 6(3), pages 383-404, July.
    2. Graves, Philip E., 1979. "A life-cycle empirical analysis of migration and climate, by race," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 6(2), pages 135-147, April.
    3. Henderson, J. Vernon, 1982. "Evaluating consumer amenities and interregional welfare differences," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 11(1), pages 32-59, January.
    4. Greenwood, Michael J, et al, 1991. "Migration, Regional Equilibrium, and the Estimation of Compensating Differentials," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 81(5), pages 1382-1390, December.
    5. Blomquist, Glenn C & Berger, Mark C & Hoehn, John P, 1988. "New Estimates of Quality of Life in Urban Areas," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 78(1), pages 89-107, March.
    6. Roback, Jennifer, 1982. "Wages, Rents, and the Quality of Life," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 90(6), pages 1257-1278, December.
    7. Mueser Peter R. & Graves Philip E., 1995. "Examining the Role of Economic Opportunity and Amenities in Explaining Population Redistribution," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(2), pages 176-200, March.
    8. Roback, Jennifer, 1988. "Wages, Rents, and Amenities: Differences among Workers and Regions," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 26(1), pages 23-41, January.
    9. Berger, Mark C. & Blomquist, Glenn C., 1992. "Mobility and destination in migration decisions: The roles of earnings, quality of life, and housing prices," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 2(1), pages 37-59, March.
    10. David E. Clark, 2004. "Amenity Valuation, Incomplete Compensation and Migration," Working Papers and Research 0402, Marquette University, Center for Global and Economic Studies and Department of Economics.
    11. Greenwood, Michael J. & Hunt, Gary L., 1989. "Jobs versus amenities in the analysis of metropolitan migration," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(1), pages 1-16, January.
    12. Gabriel, Stuart A. & Rosenthal, Stuart S., 1999. "Location and the effect of demographic traits on earnings," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(4), pages 445-461, July.
    13. Knapp, Thomas A. & Graves, Philip E., 1989. "On the role of amenities in models of migration and regional development," MPRA Paper 19914, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    14. David E. Clark & William E. Herrin & Thomas A. Knapp & Nancy E. White, 2003. "Migration and implicit amenity markets: does incomplete compensation matter?," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 3(3), pages 289-307, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Cebula, Richard & Toma, Michael, 2007. "An Empirical Analysis of Determinants of Interstate Living-Cost Differentials, 2005," MPRA Paper 52430, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Barth, James R. & Benefield, Justin D. & Hollans, Harris, 2015. "Industry Concentration and Regional Housing Market Performance," Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy, Mid-Continent Regional Science Association, vol. 45(2).

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