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U.S. Regional Population Growth 2000-2010: Natural Amenities or Urban Agglomeration

Author

Listed:
  • Dan S. Rickman

    () (Oklahoma State University)

  • Hongbo Wang

    () (Oklahoma State University)

Abstract

Using a spatial hedonic growth model, this paper empirically examines the relative roles of natural amenities and urban agglomeration economies as determinants of U.S. regional growth patterns from 2000 to 2010. Natural amenities and urban agglomeration are measured using the USDA Economic Research Service county classification codes. The general finding is that natural amenities and urban agglomeration both influenced regional growth. However, the natural amenity ranking is estimated to be positively related to increased productivity over the period rather than increased attractiveness to households. Urban agglomeration is positively related to increased amenity attractiveness to households. Within Census regional analysis revealed a stronger role for household natural amenity demand in nonmetropolitan areas.

Suggested Citation

  • Dan S. Rickman & Hongbo Wang, 2015. "U.S. Regional Population Growth 2000-2010: Natural Amenities or Urban Agglomeration," Economics Working Paper Series 1505, Oklahoma State University, Department of Economics and Legal Studies in Business.
  • Handle: RePEc:okl:wpaper:1505
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    File URL: https://business.okstate.edu/site-files/docs/ecls-working-papers/OKSWPS1505.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. John V Winters & Yu Li, 2017. "Urbanisation, natural amenities and subjective well-being: Evidence from US counties," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 54(8), pages 1956-1973, June.
    2. Dan S. Rickman & Hongbo Wang, 2016. "Regional Housing Supply Elasticity in China 1999-2013: A Spatial Equilibrium Analysis," Economics Working Paper Series 1606, Oklahoma State University, Department of Economics and Legal Studies in Business.
    3. Dan S. Rickman & Hongbo Wang, 2015. "Regional Housing Supply Elasticity in Spatial Equilibrium Growth Analysis," Economics Working Paper Series 1509, Oklahoma State University, Department of Economics and Legal Studies in Business.
    4. Alvarez-Dias, Marcos & D'Hombres, Beatrice & Ghisetti, Claudia & Pontarollo, Nicola & Dijkstra, Lewis, 2018. "The Determinants of Population Growth: Literature review and empirical analysis," Working Papers 2018-10, Joint Research Centre, European Commission (Ispra site).
    5. Kent Kovacs & Robert G. Haight & Grant West, 2017. "Protected Area Designation, Natural Amenities, and Rural Development of Forested Counties in the Continental United States," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 48(4), pages 611-639, December.
    6. Rickman, Dan S. & Wang, Hongbo, 2018. "Whither the American West? Natural Amenities, Energy and Nonmetropolitan County Growth," MPRA Paper 90078, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Hongbo Wang & Dan Rickman, 2018. "Regional growth differences in China for 1995–2013: an empirical integrative analysis of their sources," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 60(1), pages 99-117, January.
    8. Wang, Hongbo & Rickman, Dan S., 2017. "Housing Price and Population Growth across China: The Role of Housing Supply," MPRA Paper 79641, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    regional population growth; amenities; agglomeration; urban economics; economic geography;

    JEL classification:

    • R00 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General - - - General

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