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When are Cities Engines of Growth in China? Spread and Backwash Effects across the Urban Hierarchy

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  • Anping Chen
  • Mark D. Partridge

Abstract

Chen A. and Partridge M. D. When are cities engines of growth in China? Spread and backwash effects across the urban hierarchy, Regional Studies . China's remarkable growth has an urban bias, but it is unclear whether it has greatly disadvantaged particular regions. To assess this question, a Central Place Theory framework is employed to assess spread and backwash effects. It is found that New Economic Geography representations do not capture the heterogeneity across urban tiers. Market potential in China's mega-cities is inversely related to growth for smaller cities and rural communities, while medium-sized cities have positive spread effects. It is concluded that China's urban-centric process should be re-evaluated because it may not maximize aggregate growth, and growth in the mega-cities may reduce growth elsewhere.

Suggested Citation

  • Anping Chen & Mark D. Partridge, 2013. "When are Cities Engines of Growth in China? Spread and Backwash Effects across the Urban Hierarchy," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(8), pages 1313-1331, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:regstd:v:47:y:2013:i:8:p:1313-1331
    DOI: 10.1080/00343404.2011.589831
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Paolo Veneri & Vicente Ruiz, 2016. "Urban-To-Rural Population Growth Linkages: Evidence From Oecd Tl3 Regions," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 56(1), pages 3-24, January.
    2. Pierre-Philippe Combes & Sylvie Démurger & Shi Li, 2013. "Urbanisation and Migration Externalities in China," Working Papers 1303, Groupe d'Analyse et de Théorie Economique Lyon St-Étienne (GATE Lyon St-Étienne), Université de Lyon.
    3. C. Duvivier & S. Li & M.-F. Renard, 2013. "Are workers close to cities paid higher nonagricultural wages in rural China?," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(30), pages 4308-4322, October.
    4. Chao Bao & Dongmei He, 2015. "The Causal Relationship between Urbanization, Economic Growth and Water Use Change in Provincial China," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 7(12), pages 1-10, December.
    5. repec:gam:jsusta:v:7:y:2015:i:12:p:16076-16085:d:59907 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Shu‐Hen Chiang, 2012. "The Source of Metropolitan Growth: The Role of Commuting," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 43(1), pages 143-166, March.
    7. Anping Chen & Peter Nijkamp & Takatoshi Tabuchi & Jouke Dijk, 2014. "Regional science research in China: Spatial dynamics, disparities and regional productivity," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 93(2), pages 223-227, June.
    8. repec:bla:growch:v:48:y:2017:i:3:p:435-458 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Andrés Rodríguez-Pose & Rune Dahl Fitjar, 2013. "Buzz, Archipelago Economies and the Future of Intermediate and Peripheral Areas in a Spiky World," European Planning Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 21(3), pages 355-372, March.
    10. repec:gam:jsusta:v:10:y:2018:i:2:p:451-:d:131032 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Partridge, Mark D. & Yang, Benjian & Chen, Anping, 2017. "Do Border Effects Alter Regional Development: Evidence from China," MPRA Paper 82080, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    12. Juan Soto & Dusan Paredes, 2016. "Cities, Wages, And The Urban Hierarchy," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 56(4), pages 596-614, September.
    13. repec:gam:jsusta:v:9:y:2017:i:12:p:2212-:d:120951 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. Jinlong Gao & Yehua Dennis Wei & Wen Chen & Komali Yenneti, 2015. "Urban Land Expansion and Structural Change in the Yangtze River Delta, China," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 7(8), pages 1-27, July.
    15. Didit Pribadi & Andi Putra & Ernan Rustiadi, 2015. "Determining optimal location of new growth centers based on LGP–IRIO model to reduce regional disparity in Indonesia," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 54(1), pages 89-115, January.
    16. Mark D. Partridge & Dan S. Rickman, 2012. "Integrating Regional Economic Development Analysis and Land Use Economics," Economics Working Paper Series 1203, Oklahoma State University, Department of Economics and Legal Studies in Business.
    17. Chen, Anping & Dai, Tianshi & Partridge, Mark, 2017. "Agglomeration and Firm Wage Inequality: Evidence from China," MPRA Paper 83516, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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