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Moving to Nice Weather

  • Jordan Rappaport

U.S. residents, both old and young, have been moving en masse to places with nice weather. Well known is the migration towards places with warm winter weather, which is often attributed to the introduction of air conditioning. But people have also been moving to places with cooler and less-humid summer weather, which is the opposite of what would be expected from the introduction of air conditioning. Empirical evidence suggests that the main force driving weather-related moves is an increasing valuation of weather's contribution to quality of life. Cross-sectional population growth regressions are able to achieve a relatively good match with an a priori ranking of the weather's contribution to local quality of life

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Paper provided by Econometric Society in its series Econometric Society 2004 North American Summer Meetings with number 188.

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Date of creation: 11 Aug 2004
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Handle: RePEc:ecm:nasm04:188
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