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Regional Output Spillovers in China: Estimates from a VAR Model

Author

Listed:
  • Nicolaas Groenewold

    () (Department of Economics, The University of Western Australia)

  • Guoping Lee

    (School of Economics and Finance, Xi'an Jiaotong University)

  • Anping Chen

    (School of Economics and Finance, Xi'an Jiaotong University)

Abstract

Interregional spillover effects are central to China’s growth policy; yet relatively little is known about the strength and duration of these spillovers and whether their characteristics have changed over time. This paper examines the spillover of output between the three commonly-used regions of China: coastal, central and western regions. We find that there are strong spillovers from the coastal region to both other regions, from the central region to the western region but that shocks to the western region have no flow-on effect for the other two regions. Thus a policy of developing the coastal region is likely to indirectly benefit the other two regions.

Suggested Citation

  • Nicolaas Groenewold & Guoping Lee & Anping Chen, 2005. "Regional Output Spillovers in China: Estimates from a VAR Model," Economics Discussion / Working Papers 05-05, The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwa:wpaper:05-05
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    File URL: http://www.biz.uwa.edu.au/home/research/discussionworking_papers/economics/2005?f=148856
    File Function: First version, 2005
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Brian A. Cromwell, 1992. "Does California drive the West? an econometric investigation of regional spillovers," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, pages 13-23.
    2. Cai, Fang & Wang, Dewen & Du, Yang, 2002. "Regional disparity and economic growth in China: The impact of labor market distortions," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 13(2-3), pages 197-212.
    3. Carlino Gerald & Defina Robert, 1995. "Regional Income Dynamics," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 88-106, January.
    4. Cooley, Thomas F. & Leroy, Stephen F., 1985. "Atheoretical macroeconometrics: A critique," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(3), pages 283-308, November.
    5. Chang, Gene H., 2002. "The cause and cure of China's widening income disparity," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 13(4), pages 335-340, December.
    6. Clark, Todd E, 1998. "Employment Fluctuations in U.S. Regions and Industries: The Roles of National, Region-Specific, and Industry-Specific Shocks," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 16(1), pages 202-229, January.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Timo Mitze & Selin Özyurt, 2014. "The Spatial Dimension of Trade- and FDI-driven Productivity Growth in Chinese Provinces: A Global Cointegration Approach," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 45(2), pages 263-291, June.
    2. Nicolaas Groenewold & Guoping Lee & Anping Chen, 2006. "Inter-Regional Output Spillovers of Policy Shocks in China," Economics Discussion / Working Papers 06-26, The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics.
    3. Bai, Chong-En & Ma, Hong & Pan, Wenqing, 2012. "Spatial spillover and regional economic growth in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 23(4), pages 982-990.
    4. Han, Feng & Ke, Shanzi, 2016. "The effects of factor proximity and market potential on urban manufacturing output," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 31-45.
    5. Groenwold, Nicolaas & Lee, Guoping & Chen, Anping, 2008. "Inter-regional spillovers in China: The importance of common shocks and the definition of the regions," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 19(1), pages 32-52, March.
    6. Herrmann-Pillath, Carsten & Libman, Alexander & Yu, Xiaofan, 2014. "Economic integration in China: Politics and culture," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(2), pages 470-492.
    7. Nicolaas Groenewold & Guoping Lee & Anping Chen, 2006. "Inter-Regional Output Spillovers in China: Disentangling National from Regional Shocks," Economics Discussion / Working Papers 06-25, The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics.
    8. Huanhuan ZHENG & Qingyang GU, "undated". "Measuring Inter-Regional Trade Barriers," EcoMod2008 23800159, EcoMod.
    9. repec:gam:jsusta:v:10:y:2018:i:2:p:451-:d:131032 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Anping Chen & Mark D. Partridge, 2013. "When are Cities Engines of Growth in China? Spread and Backwash Effects across the Urban Hierarchy," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(8), pages 1313-1331, September.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Regional Spillovers; China; regional growth;

    JEL classification:

    • R11 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Regional Economic Activity: Growth, Development, Environmental Issues, and Changes
    • R12 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Size and Spatial Distributions of Regional Economic Activity; Interregional Trade (economic geography)

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