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SinoTERM, a multi-regional CGE model of China

  • Horridge, Mark
  • Wittwer, Glyn

The paper outlines the theory and database preparation of SinoTERM, a "bottom-up" computable general equilibrium model of the Chinese economy. The methodology by which we construct the multi-regional model allows us to present the economy of China in an unprecedented amount of detail. SinoTERM covers all 31 provinces and municipalities. The database of the model extends the published national input-output table for 2002 to 137 sectors. The single crops sector in the published national input-output table is split into 11 and the single livestock sector into three. The multi-regional CGE model provides a framework that we could modify to apply to many different policy applications. We can use SinoTERM to analyse the regional economic impacts of region-specific shocks. Such shocks could major construction projects or investments in health and education sectors, in an effort to accelerate economic growth in the lagging inland provinces. We use a 63 sector, 10 region aggregation of the SinoTERM master database to model the regional economic impacts of the construction of the Chongqing-Lichuan rail link.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal China Economic Review.

Volume (Year): 19 (2008)
Issue (Month): 4 (December)
Pages: 628-634

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Handle: RePEc:eee:chieco:v:19:y:2008:i:4:p:628-634
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/chieco

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  1. Mark Horridge & John Madden & Glyn Wittwer, 2003. "Using a highly disaggregated multi-regional single-country model to analyse the impacts of the 2002-03 drought on Australia," Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre Working Papers g-141, Victoria University, Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre.
  2. Zhang, Xiaobo & Kanbur, Ravi, 2003. "Spatial Inequality In Education And Health Care In China," Working Papers 127256, Cornell University, Department of Applied Economics and Management.
  3. James J. Heckman, 2002. "China's Investment in Human Capital," NBER Working Papers 9296, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Sylvie Demurger & Jeffrey D. Sachs & Wing Thye Woo & Shuming Bao, Gene Chang & Andrew Mellinger, 2002. "Geography, Economic Policy, and Regional Development in China," NBER Working Papers 8897, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Warwick J. McKibbin, 2006. "Global Energy and Environmental Impacts of an Expanding China," China & World Economy, Institute of World Economics and Politics, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, vol. 14(4), pages 38-56.
  6. Wittwer, Glyn & Vere, David T. & Jones, Randall E. & Griffith, Garry R., 2005. "Dynamic general equilibrium analysis of improved weed management in Australia's winter cropping systems," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 49(4), December.
  7. Yang, Dennis Tao, 2002. "What has caused regional inequality in China?," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 13(4), pages 331-334, December.
  8. Chang, Gene H., 2002. "The cause and cure of China's widening income disparity," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 13(4), pages 335-340, December.
  9. Fan, Shenggen & Zhang, Xiaobo, 2004. "Infrastructure and regional economic development in rural China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 15(2), pages 203-214.
  10. Tung Liu & Kui-Wai Li, 2005. "Disparity in Factor Contributions between Coastal and Inner Provinces in Post-reform China," Working Papers 200502, Ball State University, Department of Economics, revised Apr 2006.
  11. Philip D. Adams & Mark Horridge & Glyn Wittwer, 2003. "MMRF-GREEN: A Dynamic Multi-Regional Applied General Equilibrium Model of the Australian Economy, Based on the MMR and MONASH Models," Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre Working Papers g-140, Victoria University, Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre.
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