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Comparing China and India: Is dividend of economic reforms polarized?

The paper develops a new measure of development, namely, development quality Index (DQI), to compare performance of China and India. The results show that national level development quality grew three times faster in China than in India. Conversely, the health quality grew three times as fast in India than China over the period 1980-2004. The overall regional development quality level improved in both countries, but polarization widened in China. The sign of inter-regional polarization in China indicates a rising concentration of development gains from economic reform policies, while in recent years there are trends of polarization in economic dimension of DQI in India.

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Paper provided by Economics Section, The Graduate Institute of International Studies in its series IHEID Working Papers with number 01-2007.

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Length: 40
Date of creation: Jan 2007
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:gii:giihei:heiwp01-2007
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  1. Jahangir Aziz & Christoph Duenwald, 2001. "China's Provincial Growth Dynamics," IMF Working Papers 01/3, International Monetary Fund.
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  12. R. Nagaraj & A. Varoudakis & M.-A. Véganzonès, 2000. "Long-run growth trends and convergence across Indian States," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 12(1), pages 45-70.
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  17. Sudip Ranjan Basu & Jaya Krishnakumar & Gabriela Flores, 2004. "Spatial Distribution of Welfare Across States and Different Socio-Economic Groups in Rural and Urban India," Research Papers by the Institute of Economics and Econometrics, Geneva School of Economics and Management, University of Geneva 2004.14, Institut d'Economie et Econométrie, Université de Genève.
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