IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/uwp/landec/v83y2007i2p128-152.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Riding the Wave of Urban Growth in the Countryside: Spread, Backwash, or Stagnation?

Author

Listed:
  • Mark Partridge
  • Ray D. Bollman
  • M. Rose Olfert
  • Alessandro Alasia

Abstract

The advisability of an urban-centered growth strategy to reap the benefits of urban agglomeration economies is much debated. Rural areas benefit when the growth "spreads" to the hinterlands, especially within daily commuting distance. Yet, in distant-peripheral locations, urban growth may create a "backwash" as households relocate to the urban center. This study examines spread vs. backwash, as separate from long-run, distance-from-urban-center trend effects, using a novel Canadian GIS database. The unique nation-wide approach yields a spread and backwash rural-growth topography that varies by distance from the urban center, by urban population vs. income growth, and by size of rural community.

Suggested Citation

  • Mark Partridge & Ray D. Bollman & M. Rose Olfert & Alessandro Alasia, 2007. "Riding the Wave of Urban Growth in the Countryside: Spread, Backwash, or Stagnation?," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 83(2), pages 128-152.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwp:landec:v:83:y:2007:i:2:p:128-152
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://le.uwpress.org/cgi/reprint/83/2/128
    Download Restriction: A subscripton is required to access pdf files. Pay per article is available.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Mark S. Henry & Bertrand Schmitt & Virginie Piguet, 2001. "Spatial Econometric Models for Simultaneous Systems: Application to Rural Community Growth in France," International Regional Science Review, , vol. 24(2), pages 171-193, April.
    2. Romana Khan & Peter F. Orazem & Daniel M. Otto, 2001. "Deriving Empirical Definitions of Spatial Labor Markets: The Roles of Competing Versus Complementary Growth," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 41(4), pages 735-756.
    3. Partridge, Mark D. & Rickman, Dan S., 2003. "The waxing and waning of regional economies: the chicken-egg question of jobs versus people," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(1), pages 76-97, January.
    4. David W. Hughes & David W. Holland, 1994. "Core-Periphery Economic Linkage: A Measure of Spread and Possible Backwash Effects for the Washington Economy," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 70(3), pages 364-377.
    5. Mark D. Partridge, 2005. "Does Income Distribution Affect U.S. State Economic Growth?," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 45(2), pages 363-394.
    6. Partridge, Mark D. & Rickman, Dan S., 2003. "Do We Know Economic Development When We See It?," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 33(1), pages 17-39.
    7. Kathleen M. Day, 1992. "Interprovincial Migration and Local Public Goods," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 25(1), pages 123-144, February.
    8. Dwight W. Adamson & David E. Clark & Mark D. Partridge, 2004. "Do Urban Agglomeration Effects and Household Amenities have a Skill Bias?," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 44(2), pages 201-224.
    9. Mark Drabenstott & Nancy Novack & Stephan Weiler, 2004. "New governance for a new rural economy : reinventing public and private institutions," Main Street Economist, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, issue Aug.
    10. Mario Polèse & Richard Shearmur, 2004. "Is Distance Really Dead? Comparing Industrial Location Patterns over Time in Canada," International Regional Science Review, , vol. 27(4), pages 431-457, October.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • R11 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Regional Economic Activity: Growth, Development, Environmental Issues, and Changes
    • R14 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Land Use Patterns

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:uwp:landec:v:83:y:2007:i:2:p:128-152. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (). General contact details of provider: http://le.uwpress.org/ .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.