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When and how does commuting to cities influence rural employment growth?

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  • Lavesson, Niclas

    () (CIRCLE, Lund University)

Abstract

Urban areas tend to grow in population and employment while most rural areas face decline. Earlier research suggests that well-growing rural areas benefit from urban proximity and more specifically from rural-to-urban commuting. Studies on local labor markets suggest that highly educated individuals earn more than other commuters and that they tend to travel over longer distances to work. This suggests that the impacts on growth differ for different parts of commuting labor. The aim of this paper is to combine these literatures and explore how rural employment growth is influenced by commuting and how far across space these effects reach.

Suggested Citation

  • Lavesson, Niclas, 2015. "When and how does commuting to cities influence rural employment growth?," Papers in Innovation Studies 2015/20, Lund University, CIRCLE - Center for Innovation, Research and Competences in the Learning Economy.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:lucirc:2015_020
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Niclas Lavesson, 2018. "How does distance to urban centres influence necessity and opportunity‐based firm start‐ups?," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 97(4), pages 1279-1303, November.
    2. Adelheid Holl, 2018. "Local employment growth patterns and the Great Recession: The case of Spain," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 58(4), pages 837-863, September.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Urban spread effects; rural-urban integration; commuting;

    JEL classification:

    • R00 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General - - - General

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