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U.S. Commuting Networks and Economic Growth: Measurement and Implications for Spatial Policy

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  • STEPHAN J. GOETZ
  • YICHEOL HAN
  • JILL L. FINDEIS
  • KATHRYN J. BRASIER

Abstract

Labor market areas (LMAs) have long been a staple of regional and urban analysis. As commuting patterns have expanded over time, these areas have become larger and more complex, and the dichotomous designation of a county either belonging to an LMA or not may no longer be adequate. We apply recent advances in network science to conduct a more refined analysis of U.S. commuting patterns, and examine their effects on local economic growth. Results show that network degree and entropy measures explain variations in county per capita income growth patterns. Higher in- and out-commuting entropies are associated with lower per capita income growth, but their interaction enhances economic growth in places simultaneously open to both in- and out-commuters. Using these results, common ground may be found for creating new forms of regional governance that better reflect local realities of cross-county border flows of workers and economic activity. Copyright (c) 2010 Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation (c) 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc..

Suggested Citation

  • Stephan J. Goetz & Yicheol Han & Jill L. Findeis & Kathryn J. Brasier, 2010. "U.S. Commuting Networks and Economic Growth: Measurement and Implications for Spatial Policy," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 41(2), pages 276-302.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:growch:v:41:y:2010:i:2:p:276-302
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    Cited by:

    1. Ivan T. Kandilov & Mitch Renkow, 2010. "Infrastructure Investment and Rural Economic Development: An Evaluation of USDA's Broadband Loan Program," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 41(2), pages 165-191.
    2. Jonathan Corcoran & Alessandra Faggian & Philip Mccann, 2010. "Human Capital in Remote and Rural Australia: The Role of Graduate Migration," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 41(2), pages 192-220.
    3. Mark D. Partridge & M. Rose Olfert, 2011. "The Winners' Choice: Sustainable Economic Strategies for Successful 21st-Century Regions," Applied Economic Perspectives and Policy, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 33(2), pages 143-178.
    4. Marasteanu, I. Julia & Jaenicke, Edward C., 2014. "Clusters of Organic Operations and their Impact on Regional Economic Growth in the United States," 2014 Annual Meeting, July 27-29, 2014, Minneapolis, Minnesota 170336, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    5. Gordon Mulligan & Mark Partridge & John Carruthers, 2012. "Central place theory and its reemergence in regional science," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 48(2), pages 405-431, April.
    6. Jason P. Brown & Stephan J. Goetz & Mary C. Ahearn & Chyi-lyi (Kathleen) Liang, 2014. "Linkages Between Community-Focused Agriculture, Farm Sales, and Regional Growth," Economic Development Quarterly, , vol. 28(1), pages 5-16, February.
    7. Guangqing Chi, 2012. "The Impacts of Transport Accessibility on Population Change across Rural, Suburban and Urban Areas: A Case Study of Wisconsin at Sub-county Levels," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 49(12), pages 2711-2731, September.

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