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Urban Growth and Transportation

  • Gilles Duranton
  • Matthew A. Turner

We estimate the effects of interstate highways on the growth of U.S. cities between 1983 and 2003. We find that a 10% increase in a city's initial stock of highways causes about a 1.5% increase in its employment over this 20 year period. To estimate a structural model of urban growth and transportation, we rely on an instrumental variables estimation that uses a 1947 plan of the interstate highway system, an 1898 map of railroads, and maps of the early explorations of the U.S. as instruments for 1983 highways. Copyright , Oxford University Press.

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/restud/rds010
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Article provided by Oxford University Press in its journal Review of Economic Studies.

Volume (Year): 79 (2012)
Issue (Month): 4 ()
Pages: 1407-1440

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Handle: RePEc:oup:restud:v:79:y:2012:i:4:p:1407-1440
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