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Core-Periphery Economic Linkage: A Measure of Spread and Possible Backwash Effects for the Washington Economy

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  • David W. Hughes
  • David W. Holland

Abstract

Many questions regarding economic development should be viewed in a regional core-periphery framework. A core-periphery input-output model of the Washington state economy was constructed. The core region supplied the periphery with higher-order services while the periphery furnished the core with natural resource-based commodities. Weak backward linkages from major core industries to the periphery lead to rejection of the growth-pole theory tenet that core growth supports periphery growth. Economic growth in the periphery was felt more strongly in the core because periphery sectors with strong within-region effects generally had strong impacts in the core.

Suggested Citation

  • David W. Hughes & David W. Holland, 1994. "Core-Periphery Economic Linkage: A Measure of Spread and Possible Backwash Effects for the Washington Economy," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 70(3), pages 364-377.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwp:landec:v:70:y:1994:i:3:p:364-377
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    Cited by:

    1. Paolo Veneri & Vicente Ruiz, 2016. "Urban-To-Rural Population Growth Linkages: Evidence From Oecd Tl3 Regions," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 56(1), pages 3-24, January.
    2. David Gray, 2005. "An examination of regional interaction and super-regions in Britain: An error correction model approach," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(5), pages 619-632.
    3. Hughes, David W. & Litz, Vaneska N., 1996. "Rural-Urban Economic Linkages For Agriculture And Food Processing In The Monroe, Louisiana, Functional Economic Area," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 28(02), December.
    4. Portnov, Boris A., 2005. "Development similarities in urban clusters: Evidence from a spatial analysis of Israel's urban system," Socio-Economic Planning Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 39(4), pages 287-306, December.
    5. Elena G. Irwin & Andrew M. Isserman & Maureen Kilkenny & Mark D. Partridge, 2010. "A Century of Research on Rural Development and Regional Issues," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 92(2), pages 522-553.
    6. Sanna-Mari Ahtonen, 2003. "Spatial autocorrelation in employment-output relation," ERSA conference papers ersa03p209, European Regional Science Association.
    7. Chloé Duvivier, 2013. "Does Urban Proximity Enhance Technical Efficiency? Evidence From Chinese Agriculture," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 53(5), pages 923-943, December.
    8. Joanna P. Ganning & Kathy Baylis & Bumsoo Lee, 2013. "Spread And Backwash Effects For Nonmetropolitan Communities In The U.S," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 53(3), pages 464-480, August.
    9. Portnov, Boris A., 2002. "Interregional inequalities in Israel: Explanatory model and empirical data," ERSA conference papers ersa02p003, European Regional Science Association.
    10. Hidekazu Itoh, 2016. "Understanding of economic spillover mechanism by structural path analysis: a case study of interregional social accounting matrix focused on institutional sectors in Japan," Journal of Economic Structures, Springer;Pan-Pacific Association of Input-Output Studies (PAPAIOS), vol. 5(1), pages 1-20, December.
    11. Wagner, John E., 2000. "Regional Economic Diversity: Action, Concept, or State of Confusion," Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy, Mid-Continent Regional Science Association, vol. 30(2).
    12. Carole Doucet, 2004. "Espaces ruraux, espaces périphériques ? Les perspectives de développement économique associées au vignoble de Bordeaux," Post-Print hal-01201062, HAL.
    13. Chang K. Seung, 2014. "Estimating effects of exogenous output changes: an application of multi-regional social accounting matrix (MRSAM) method to natural resource management," Regional Science Policy & Practice, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 6(2), pages 177-193, June.
    14. Doucet, Carole, 2004. "Espaces ruraux, espaces périphériques ? Les perspectives de développement économique associées au vignoble de Bordeaux," Cahiers d'Economie et de Sociologie Rurales (CESR), INRA (French National Institute for Agricultural Research), vol. 70.
    15. Paul Lewin & Bruce Weber & David Holland, 2013. "Core–periphery dynamics in the Portland, Oregon, region: 1982–2006," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 51(2), pages 411-433, October.
    16. repec:gam:jsusta:v:10:y:2018:i:2:p:451-:d:131032 is not listed on IDEAS
    17. Mark Partridge & Ray D. Bollman & M. Rose Olfert & Alessandro Alasia, 2007. "Riding the Wave of Urban Growth in the Countryside: Spread, Backwash, or Stagnation?," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 83(2), pages 128-152.
    18. Boisvert, Richard N. & Kay, David & Turvey, Calum G., 2012. "Macroeconomic costs to large scale disruptions of food production: The case of foot- and-mouth disease in the United States," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 29(5), pages 1921-1930.
    19. Mark D. Partridge & Dan S. Rickman, 2012. "Integrating Regional Economic Development Analysis and Land Use Economics," Economics Working Paper Series 1203, Oklahoma State University, Department of Economics and Legal Studies in Business.
    20. Carole Doucet, 2004. "Espaces ruraux, espaces périphériques ? Les perspectives de développement économique associées au vignoble de Bordeaux," Cahiers d'Economie et Sociologie Rurales, INRA Department of Economics, vol. 70, pages 49-76.

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