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Commuting, Migration, and Rural-Urban Population Dynamics

Listed author(s):
  • Mitch Renkow
  • Dale Hoover

Over the past 25 years social scientists attempting to explain the dramatic changes in the relative distribution of urban and rural population growth have gravitated toward two competing explanations. The "regional restructuring hypothesis" holds that changes in the spatial distribution of employment opportunities have been dominant whereas the "deconcentration hypothesis" attributes these changes to changes in residential preferences of workers and consumers. We develop an empirical test of these two explanations based on whether commuting and migration are positively or negatively related after controlling for other economic factors. Our econometric results support the deconcentration hypothesis. Copyright 2000 Blackwell Publishers

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Article provided by Wiley Blackwell in its journal Journal of Regional Science.

Volume (Year): 40 (2000)
Issue (Month): 2 ()
Pages: 261-287

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Handle: RePEc:bla:jregsc:v:40:y:2000:i:2:p:261-287
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  1. Greenwood, Michael J & Hunt, Gary L, 1984. "Migration and Interregional Employment Redistribution in the United States," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 74(5), pages 957-969, December.
  2. Knapp, Thomas A. & Graves, Philip E., 1989. "On the role of amenities in models of migration and regional development," MPRA Paper 19914, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  3. van der Veen, Anne & Evers, Gerard, 1983. "A simultaneous model for regional labor supply, incorporating labor force participation, commuting and migration," Socio-Economic Planning Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 17(5-6), pages 239-250.
  4. Roback, Jennifer, 1982. "Wages, Rents, and the Quality of Life," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 90(6), pages 1257-1278, December.
  5. Topel, Robert H, 1986. "Local Labor Markets," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 94(3), pages 111-143, June.
  6. Siegel, Jay, 1975. "Intrametropolitan migration: A simultaneous model of employment and residential location of white and black households," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 2(1), pages 29-47, January.
  7. Richard Jackman & S Savouri, 1992. "Regional Migration versus Regional Commuting: The Identification of Housing and Employment Flows," CEP Discussion Papers dp0057, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  8. Madden, Janice Fanning, 1980. "Urban Land Use and the Growth in Two-Earner Households," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 70(2), pages 191-197, May.
  9. K. Newey, Whitney, 1985. "Generalized method of moments specification testing," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 29(3), pages 229-256, September.
  10. Ihlanfeldt, Keith R., 1992. "Intraurban wage gradients: Evidence by race, gender, occupational class, and sector," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 70-91, July.
  11. Freedman, Ora & Kern, Clifford R., 1997. "A model of workplace and residence choice in two-worker households," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(3), pages 241-260, June.
  12. Zax, Jeffrey S., 1994. "When is a move a migration?," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(3), pages 341-360, June.
  13. Greenwood, Michael J, et al, 1991. "Migration, Regional Equilibrium, and the Estimation of Compensating Differentials," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 81(5), pages 1382-1390, December.
  14. Glenn Fuguitt & David Brown, 1990. "Residential preferences and population redistribution: 1972–1988," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 27(4), pages 589-600, November.
  15. Jackman, Richard & Savouri, Savvas, 1992. "Regional Migration versus Regional Commuting: The Identification of Housing and Employment Flows," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 39(3), pages 272-287, August.
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