IDEAS home Printed from
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Job and residential mobility in the Netherlands: the influence of human capital, household composition and location

  • Kronenberg, Kristin
  • Carree, Martin

This study identifies and evaluates determinants of employees’ job and residential mobility. It examines mobility of fulltime employees in selected sectors in 2003/2004, using register data provided by Statistics Netherlands. We estimate a multinomial model of job and residential change. The results illustrate that individuals decide upon changing jobs and/or relocating by taking into account the strength of their family- and job-related ties. We also find that the prevalence of internal versus external career opportunities impedes job changes. While a high salary facilitates relocation, our findings regarding the effect of salary on interfirm mobility were inconclusive. A long commuting distance encourages (simultaneous) job and housing mobility, while being situated in the municipality of a large city encourages employees to either change jobs, or to relocate.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL:
File Function: original version
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 25840.

in new window

Date of creation: 2010
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:25840
Contact details of provider: Postal: Schackstr. 4, D-80539 Munich, Germany
Phone: +49-(0)89-2180-2219
Fax: +49-(0)89-2180-3900
Web page:

More information through EDIRC

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Lutz Schneider, 2007. "Zu alt für einen Wechsel? Zum Zusammenhang von Alter, Lohndifferentialen und betrieblicher Mobilität," IWH Discussion Papers 1, Halle Institute for Economic Research.
  2. Jacob Mincer, 1977. "Family Migration Decisions," NBER Working Papers 0199, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Acemoglu, Daron & Pischke, Jörn-Steffen, 1998. "The Structure of Wages and Investment in General Training," CEPR Discussion Papers 1833, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  4. Jos van Ommeren, 2000. "Job and residential search behaviour of two-earner households," Papers in Regional Science, Springer, vol. 79(4), pages 375-391.
  5. Clark, William A. V. & Huang, Youqin & Withers, Suzanne, 2003. "Does commuting distance matter?: Commuting tolerance and residential change," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 199-221, March.
  6. Etzioni, Amitai, 1986. "The Case for a Multiple-Utility Conception," Economics and Philosophy, Cambridge University Press, vol. 2(02), pages 159-184, October.
  7. Kan, Kamhon, 2003. "Residential mobility and job changes under uncertainty," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(3), pages 566-586, November.
  8. Lex Borghans & Hans Heijke, 2005. "The production and use of human capital: Introduction," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(2), pages 133-142.
  9. Linneman, Peter & Graves, Philip E., 1983. "Migration and job change: A multinomial logit approach," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(3), pages 263-279, November.
  10. Thomas A. Knapp & Nancy E. White & David E. Clark, 2001. "A Nested Logit Approach to Household Mobility," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 41(1), pages 1-22.
  11. Bergin, Adele, 2009. "Job Mobility in Ireland," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 40(1), pages 15-47.
  12. Feijten Peteke & Maarten van Ham, 2007. "Residential mobility and migration of the separated," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 17(21), pages 623-654, December.
  13. Jackman, Richard & Savouri, Savvas, 1992. "Regional Migration versus Regional Commuting: The Identification of Housing and Employment Flows," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 39(3), pages 272-87, August.
  14. Satu Nivalainen, 2004. "Determinants of family migration: short moves vs. long moves," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 17(1), pages 157-175, February.
  15. Chen, Yong & Rosenthal, Stuart S., 2008. "Local amenities and life-cycle migration: Do people move for jobs or fun?," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 64(3), pages 519-537, November.
  16. Miles M. Finney & Janet E. Kohlhase, 2008. "The Effect Of Urbanization On Labor Turnover," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 48(2), pages 311-328.
  17. Gary S. Becker, 1962. "Investment in Human Capital: A Theoretical Analysis," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 70, pages 9.
  18. Bartel, Ann P, 1979. "The Migration Decision: What Role Does Job Mobility Play?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 69(5), pages 775-86, December.
  19. Zax, Jeffrey S, 1991. "The Substitution between Moves and Quits," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 101(409), pages 1510-21, November.
  20. Jari Ritsila & Marko Ovaskainen, 2001. "Migration and regional centralization of human capital," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 33(3), pages 317-325.
  21. Roberto Cellini, 2007. "Migration and welfare: a very simple model," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(7), pages 885-894.
  22. Becker, Gary S, 1981. "Altruism in the Family and Selfishness in the Market Place," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 48(189), pages 1-15, February.
  23. Kent Eliasson & Urban Lindgren & Olle Westerlund, 2003. "Geographical Labour Mobility: Migration or Commuting?," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(8), pages 827-837.
  24. Piet Rietveld & Peter Nijkamp & Jos van Ommeren, 2000. "Job mobility, residential mobility and commuting: A theoretical analysis using search theory," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer, vol. 34(2), pages 213-232.
  25. Richard Jackman & S Savouri, 1992. "Regional Migration versus Regional Commuting: The Identification of Housing and Employment Flows," CEP Discussion Papers dp0057, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  26. Boheim, Rene & Taylor, Mark P., 2007. "From the dark end of the street to the bright side of the road? The wage returns to migration in Britain," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(1), pages 99-117, January.
  27. Weiss, Andrew, 1984. "Determinants of Quit Behavior," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 2(3), pages 371-87, July.
  28. Boockmann, Bernhard & Steffes, Susanne, 2007. "Seniority and Job Stability: A Quantile Regression Approach Using Matched Employer-Employee Data," ZEW Discussion Papers 07-014, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
  29. Borsch-Supan, Axel, 1990. "Education and its double-edged impact on mobility," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 9(1), pages 39-53, March.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:25840. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Ekkehart Schlicht)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.