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A Nested Logit Approach to Household Mobility


  • Thomas A. Knapp
  • Nancy E. White
  • David E. Clark


This study analyzes personal and site characteristics in a model of intraMSA and interMSA mobility. Households are assumed to choose a single type of move, intraMSA or interMSA, while simultaneously choosing a central city or suburban destination. We demonstrate that a nested logit model is appropriate on both theoretical and empirical grounds. The sample consists of intrametropolitan and intermetropolitan movers drawn from the 1990 U.S. Census PUMS. Personal characteristics drawn from the PUMS are matched to numerous site characteristics (climatic measures, other amenities, state and local fiscal characteristics, and other urban quality measures) drawn from a variety of sources. Nested logit direct and cross elasticities are presented for a number of site attributes. Copyright 2001 BlackwellPublishers

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  • Thomas A. Knapp & Nancy E. White & David E. Clark, 2001. "A Nested Logit Approach to Household Mobility," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 41(1), pages 1-22.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jregsc:v:41:y:2001:i:1:p:1-22

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    10. Bartik, Timothy J. & Butler, J. S. & Liu, Jin-Tan, 1992. "Maximum score estimates of the determinants of residential mobility: Implications for the value of residential attachment and neighborhood amenities," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 233-256, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Richard Cebula & Usha Nair-Reichert, 2012. "Migration and public policies: a further empirical analysis," Journal of Economics and Finance, Springer;Academy of Economics and Finance, vol. 36(1), pages 238-248, January.
    2. repec:rri:wpaper:200704 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Mika Haapanen & Hannu Tervo, 2006. "Migration Behaviour and Duration of Residence Spells of Graduating Students in Finland in 1987-2002," ERSA conference papers ersa06p379, European Regional Science Association.
    4. Talat Mahmood & Klaus Schömann, 2003. "On the Migration Decision of IT-Graduates: A Two-Level Nested Logit Model," CIG Working Papers SP II 2003-22, Wissenschaftszentrum Berlin (WZB), Research Unit: Competition and Innovation (CIG).
    5. Brian Cushing & Jacques Poot, 2003. "Crossing boundaries and borders: Regional science advances in migration modelling," Papers in Regional Science, Springer;Regional Science Association International, vol. 83(1), pages 317-338, October.
    6. Peter Berck & Sofia Tano & Olle Westerlund, 2016. "Regional Sorting of Human Capital: The Choice of Location among Young Adults in Sweden," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 50(5), pages 757-770, May.
    7. Mahmood, Talat & Schömann, Klaus, 2009. "The decision to migrate: A simultaneous decision making approach," Discussion Papers, Research Unit: Competition and Innovation SP II 2009-17, Social Science Research Center Berlin (WZB).
    8. Richard J. Cebula & J. R. Clark, 2013. "An extension of the Tiebout hypothesis of voting with one's feet: the Medicaid magnet hypothesis," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(32), pages 4575-4583, November.
    9. Etienne Wasmer & Peter Fredriksson & Ana Lamo & Julian Messina & Giovanni Peri, 2005. "The Macroeconomics of Education," Sciences Po publications info:hdl:2441/9064, Sciences Po.
    10. Kronenberg, Kristin & Carree, Martin, 2010. "Job and residential mobility in the Netherlands: the influence of human capital, household composition and location," MPRA Paper 25840, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    11. Saltz, Ira S. & Capener, Don, 2016. "60 Years Later and Still Going Strong: The Continued Relevance of the Tiebout Hypothesis," Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy, Mid-Continent Regional Science Association, vol. 46(1).
    12. Adamson, Dwight W. & Waugh, Andrew, 2012. "Farm Operator Entry and Exit Behavior: A Longitudinal Analysis," 2012 Annual Meeting, August 12-14, 2012, Seattle, Washington 124053, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    13. David Albouy & Andrew Hanson, 2014. "Are Houses Too Big or In the Wrong Place? Tax Benefits to Housing and Inefficiencies in Location and Consumption," Tax Policy and the Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 28(1), pages 63-96.
    14. Christiadi & Brian Cushing, 2007. "Conditional Logit, IIA, and Alternatives for Estimating Models of Interstate Migration," Working Papers Working Paper 2007-04, Regional Research Institute, West Virginia University.
    15. Nai Jia Lee, 2003. "Expected Return of Housing and Mortgage Termination," International Real Estate Review, Asian Real Estate Society, vol. 6(1), pages 75-101.
    16. Abigail Wozniak, 2010. "Are College Graduates More Responsive to Distant Labor Market Opportunities?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 45(4), pages 944-970.
    17. Karner, Anne M. & Dorfman, Jeffrey H., 2012. "Retiree Migration: Considerations of Amenity and Health Access Drivers," 2012 Annual Meeting, August 12-14, 2012, Seattle, Washington 124606, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    18. David Albouy & Andrew Hanson, 2014. "Tax Benefits to Housing and Inefficiencies in Location and Consumption," NBER Working Papers 19815, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    19. Lorenzo Corsini & Marco Guerrazzi, 2007. "The Transition from Temporary to Permanent Employment: Evidence from Tuscany," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 21(2), pages 303-332, June.
    20. Ellen, Ingrid Gould & O'Regan, Katherine, 2010. "Crime and urban flight revisited: The effect of the 1990s drop in crime on cities," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(3), pages 247-259, November.
    21. Lee, Nai Jia & Ong, Seow Eng, 2005. "Upward mobility, house price volatility, and housing equity," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(2), pages 127-146, June.
    22. Wozniak, Abigail, 2006. "Educational Differences in the Migration Responses of Young Workers to Local Labor Market Conditions," IZA Discussion Papers 1954, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    23. repec:spo:wpecon:info:hdl:2441/9064 is not listed on IDEAS
    24. John Deskins & William Fox, 2008. "Measuring Behavioral Responses to the Property Tax," International Center for Public Policy Working Paper Series, at AYSPS, GSU paper0816, International Center for Public Policy, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University.

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