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Job Mobility in Ireland

  • Adele Bergin

    ()

    (Economics, National University of Ireland, Maynooth and ESRI, Dublin)

This paper investigates the factors that determine job-to-job mobility in Ireland over the period 1995 to 2001. It finds that labour market experience, working in the public sector, human capital, whether a person is overskilled and the sector they work in are important determinants of job change. In addition, the paper finds the rate of job mobility in Ireland practically doubled over the period. The sample is divided into two time periods and a decomposition technique is applied to ascertain how much of the increase in mobility is attributable to compositional changes and how much is due to other factors

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File URL: http://repec.maynoothuniversity.ie/mayecw-files/N1940708.pdf
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Paper provided by Department of Economics, Finance and Accounting, National University of Ireland - Maynooth in its series Economics, Finance and Accounting Department Working Paper Series with number n1940708.pdf.

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Date of creation: 2008
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Handle: RePEc:may:mayecw:n1940708.pdf
Contact details of provider: Postal: Maynooth, Co. Kildare
Phone: 353-1-7083728
Fax: 353-1-7083934
Web page: http://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/economics-finance-and-accounting

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  1. Gary S. Becker, 1962. "Investment in Human Capital: A Theoretical Analysis," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 70, pages 9.
  2. John M. Barron & Dan A. Black & Mark A. Loewenstein, 1993. "Gender Differences in Training, Capital, and Wages," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 28(2), pages 343-364.
  3. Kristen Keith & Abagail McWilliams, 1999. "The Returns to mobility and job search by gender," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 52(3), pages 460-477, April.
  4. Daniel S. Hamermesh & Gerard Pfann, 1992. "Turnover and the Dynamics of Labor Demand," NBER Working Papers 4204, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. repec:ese:iserwp:2005-03 is not listed on IDEAS
  6. Groot, Wim & Verberne, Maartje, 1997. "Aging, Job Mobility, and Compensation," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 49(3), pages 380-403, July.
  7. Jovanovic, Boyan, 1979. "Job Matching and the Theory of Turnover," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 87(5), pages 972-90, October.
  8. Burgess, Simon & Lane, Julia & Stevens, David, 2000. "Job Flows, Worker Flows, and Churning," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 18(3), pages 473-502, July.
  9. Axel Borsch-Supan, 1987. "The Role of Education: Mobility Increasing or Mobility Impeding?," NBER Working Papers 2329, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Johnson, William R, 1979. "The Demand for General and Specific Education with Occupational Mobility," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 46(4), pages 695-705, October.
  11. Derek Neal, 1998. "The Complexity of Job Mobility Among Young Men," NBER Working Papers 6662, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  12. Helen Connolly & Peter Gottschalk, 2000. "Differences in Wage Growth by Education Level: Do Less Educated Workers Gain Less from Work Experience?," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 473, Boston College Department of Economics, revised 26 Aug 2006.
  13. Farber, Henry S., 1999. "Mobility and stability: The dynamics of job change in labor markets," Handbook of Labor Economics, in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 37, pages 2439-2483 Elsevier.
  14. Francine D. Blau & Larry M. Kahn, 1981. "Race and sex differences in quits by young workers," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 34(4), pages 563-577, July.
  15. Loprest, Pamela J, 1992. "Gender Differences in Wage Growth and Job Mobility," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(2), pages 526-32, May.
  16. Topel, Robert H & Ward, Michael P, 1992. "Job Mobility and the Careers of Young Men," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 107(2), pages 439-79, May.
  17. Baker, Michael & Solon, Gary, 1999. "Earnings Dynamics and Inequality Among Canadian Men, 1976-1992: Evidence from Longitudinal Income Tax Records," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 1999130e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
  18. Barrett, Alan & Fitz Gerald, John & Nolan, Brian, 2000. "Earnings Inequality, Returns to Education and Immigration into Ireland," CEPR Discussion Papers 2493, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  19. Greenwood, Michael J, 1975. "Research on Internal Migration in the United States: A Survey," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 13(2), pages 397-433, June.
  20. Royalty, A.B., 1993. "Does Job Matching Differ by Sex?," Papers 689, Yale - Economic Growth Center.
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