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Job and residential search behaviour of two-earner households


  • Jos van Ommeren

    () (Centre for European HRM, School of Management, Cranfield University, Cranfield, Bedfordshire, MK43 OAL, UK)


Even though a large share of the workforce belongs to two-earner households, job search models invariably ignore the interaction between the wage earners of the same household. In this article, job and residential search behaviour of two-earner households are simultaneously analysed. The main finding of the theoretical model is that two-earner households search less intensively in the housing market, and more intensively in the labour market, if the distance between the workplaces of the two wage earners is longer. In the empirical part the latter finding has been analysed based upon a data set for Dutch two-earner households.

Suggested Citation

  • Jos van Ommeren, 2000. "Job and residential search behaviour of two-earner households," Papers in Regional Science, Springer;Regional Science Association International, vol. 79(4), pages 375-391.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:presci:v:79:y:2000:i:4:p:375-391 Note: Received: 12 May 1998

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Ross, Stephen L., 1998. "Racial Differences in Residential and Job Mobility: Evidence Concerning the Spatial Mismatch Hypothesis," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(1), pages 112-135, January.
    2. Holzer Harry J. & Ihlanfeldt Keith R. & Sjoquist David L., 1994. "Work, Search, and Travel among White and Black Youth," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(3), pages 320-345, May.
    3. Susan J. Popkin & James E. Rosenbaum & Patricia M. Meaden, 1993. "Labor market experiences of low-income black women in middle-class suburbs: Evidence from a survey of gautreaux program participants," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 12(3), pages 556-573.
    4. Manuel Pastor, Jr. & Ara Robinson Adams, 1996. "Keeping Down With The Joneses: Neighbors, Networks, And Wages," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 26(2), pages 116-145, Fall.
    5. Raphael, Steven, 1998. "The Spatial Mismatch Hypothesis and Black Youth Joblessness: Evidence from the San Francisco Bay Area," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(1), pages 79-111, January.
    6. Keith Ihlanfeldt, 1992. "Job Accessibility and the Employment and School Enrollment of Teenagers," Books from Upjohn Press, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, number jaes, November.
    7. Thomas J. Cooke & Stephen L. Ross, 1999. "Sample Selection Bias in Models of Commuting Time," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 36(9), pages 1597-1611, August.
    8. Ihlanfeldt Keith R., 1993. "Intra-urban Job Accessibility and Hispanic Youth Employment Rates," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 254-271, March.
    9. Gabriel, Stuart A. & Rosenthal, Stuart S., 1996. "Commutes, Neighborhood Effects, and Earnings: An Analysis of Racial Discrimination and Compensating Differentials," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 61-83, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:oup:oxecpp:v:69:y:2017:i:3:p:734-757. is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Jennifer Roberts & Karl Taylor, 2017. "Intra-household commuting choices and local labour markets," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 69(3), pages 734-757.
    3. Surprenant-Legault, Julien & Patterson, Zachary & El-Geneidy, Ahmed M., 2013. "Commuting trade-offs and distance reduction in two-worker households," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 12-28.
    4. Kronenberg, Kristin & Carree, Martin, 2010. "Job and residential mobility in the Netherlands: the influence of human capital, household composition and location," MPRA Paper 25840, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Eva Gutierrez Puigarnau & Jos N. van Ommeren (VU), 2013. "Do rich households live farther away from their workplaces?," CPB Discussion Paper 244, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
    6. Mette Deding & Trine Filges, 2010. "Geographical Mobility Of Danish Dual-Earner Couples-The Relationship Between Change Of Job And Change Of Residence," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 50(2), pages 615-634.
    7. Mette Deding & Trine Filges & Jos Van Ommeren, 2009. "Spatial Mobility And Commuting: The Case Of Two-Earner Households," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 49(1), pages 113-147.
    8. Maat, Kees & Timmermans, Harry J.P., 2009. "Influence of the residential and work environment on car use in dual-earner households," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 43(7), pages 654-664, August.

    More about this item


    Two-earner households; job mobility; residential mobility; commuting; search;

    JEL classification:

    • J6 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population


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