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Family migration and mobility sequences in the United States

  • William A.V. Clark

    (University of California, Los Angeles)

  • Suzanne Davies Withers

    (University of Washington, Seattle)

Registered author(s):

    Significant changes in family composition in the past quarter-century raise important questions about life-course outcomes embedded in these family changes, especially in relation to the migratory and mobility patterns of individuals and families. The classic distinction between long-distance/employment and short-distance/housing-related moves may be eroding. Patterns of movement appear much less dichotomous and more diverse as family structures become more diverse. Using the Panel Study of Income Dynamics this study shows that the previous research, which suggested relatively simple links between long-distance and short-distance moves, is an over-simplification. Moreover, there is much more unintended movement at both migratory and mobility scales suggesting the economic models of employment migration may be missing important family dynamics in the migration mobility process.

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    File URL: http://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol17/20/17-20.pdf
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    Article provided by Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany in its journal Demographic Research.

    Volume (Year): 17 (2007)
    Issue (Month): 20 (December)
    Pages: 591-622

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    Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:17:y:2007:i:20
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.demogr.mpg.de/

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    1. Sandell, Steven H, 1977. "Women and the Economics of Family Migration," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 59(4), pages 406-14, November.
    2. Adrian J Bailey & Megan K Blake & Thomas J Cooke, 2004. "Migration, care, and the linked lives of dual-earner households," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 36(9), pages 1617-1632, September.
    3. Thomas J Cooke, 2001. "'Trailing wife' or 'trailing mother'? The effect of parental status on the relationship between family migration and the labor-market participation of married women," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 33(3), pages 419-430, March.
    4. Rives, Janet M. & West, Janet M., 1993. "Wife's employment and worker relocation behavior," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 13-22.
    5. Linneman, Peter & Graves, Philip E., 1983. "Migration and job change: A multinomial logit approach," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(3), pages 263-279, November.
    6. Satu Nivalainen, 2004. "Determinants of family migration: short moves vs. long moves," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 17(1), pages 157-175, February.
    7. Jacobsen, Joyce P. & Levin, Laurence M., 2000. "The effects of internal migration on the relative economic status of women and men," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 29(3), pages 291-304, May.
    8. Paul Boyle & Thomas Cooke & Keith Halfacree & Darren Smith, 2003. "The effect of long-distance family migration and motherhood on partnered women's labour-market activity rates in Great Britain and the USA," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 35(12), pages 2097-2114, December.
    9. Paul Boyle & Thomas Cooke & Keith Halfacree & Darren Smith, 2001. "A cross-national comparison of the impact of family migration on women’s employment status," Demography, Springer, vol. 38(2), pages 201-213, May.
    10. Anne Green, 2004. "Is Relocation Redundant? Observations on the Changing Nature and Impacts of Employment-related Geographical Mobility in the UK," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(6), pages 629-641.
    11. William Clark & Youqin Huang, 2004. "Linking Migration and Mobility: Individual and Contextual Effects in Housing Markets in the UK," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(6), pages 617-628.
    12. Adrian J. Bailey & Thomas J. Cooke, 1998. "Family Migration and Employment: The Importance of Migration History and Gender," International Regional Science Review, , vol. 21(2), pages 99-118, August.
    13. A. E. Green, 1997. "A Question of Compromise? Case Study Evidence on the Location and Mobility Strategies of Dual Career Households," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 31(7), pages 641-657.
    14. S Davies Withers, 1998. "Linking household transitions and housing transitions: a longitudinal analysis of renters," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 30(4), pages 615-630, April.
    15. Mincer, Jacob, 1978. "Family Migration Decisions," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 86(5), pages 749-73, October.
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