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The effects of internal migration on the relative economic status of women and men

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  • Jacobsen, Joyce P.
  • Levin, Laurence M.

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  • Jacobsen, Joyce P. & Levin, Laurence M., 2000. "The effects of internal migration on the relative economic status of women and men," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 29(3), pages 291-304, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:soceco:v:29:y:2000:i:3:p:291-304
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Tienda, M. & Booth, K., 1988. "Migration, Gender And Social Change: A Review And Reformulation," University of Chicago - Economics Research Center 88-3, Chicago - Economics Research Center.
    2. Krieg, Randall G., 1992. "Internal Migration and Its Influence on Earnings of Working Husbands and Wives," Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy, Mid-Continent Regional Science Association, vol. 22(2).
    3. Mincer, Jacob, 1978. "Family Migration Decisions," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 86(5), pages 749-773, October.
    4. Frank, Robert H, 1978. "Family Location Constraints and the Geographic Distribution of Female Professionals," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 86(1), pages 117-130, February.
    5. Marta Tienda & Karen Booth, "undated". "Migration, Gender and Social Change: A Review and Reformulation," University of Chicago - Population Research Center 88-3, Chicago - Population Research Center.
    6. Sandell, Steven H, 1977. "Women and the Economics of Family Migration," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 59(4), pages 406-414, November.
    7. Rives, Janet M. & West, Janet M., 1993. "Wife's employment and worker relocation behavior," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 13-22.
    8. Shelly Lundberg & Robert A. Pollak, 1996. "Bargaining and Distribution in Marriage," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 10(4), pages 139-158, Fall.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Alan Benson, 2014. "Rethinking the Two-Body Problem: The Segregation of Women Into Geographically Dispersed Occupations," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 51(5), pages 1619-1639, October.
    2. Kent Eliasson & Robert Nakosteen & Olle Westerlund & Michael Zimmer, 2014. "All in the family: Self-selection and migration by couples," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 93(1), pages 101-124, March.
    3. Birgitta Rabe & Mark P. Taylor, 2012. "Differences in Opportunities? Wage, Employment and House-Price Effects on Migration," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 74(6), pages 831-855, December.
    4. Birgitta Rabe, 2011. "Dual-earner migration. Earnings gains, employment and self-selection," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 24(2), pages 477-497, April.
    5. Åström, Johanna & Westerlund, Olle, 2009. "Sex and Migration: Who is the Tied Mover?," Umeå Economic Studies 787, Umeå University, Department of Economics.
    6. Foged, Mette, 2016. "Family migration and relative earnings potentials," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 87-100.
    7. William A.V. Clark & Suzanne Davies Withers, 2007. "Family migration and mobility sequences in the United States," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 17(20), pages 591-622, December.
    8. Marjan Petreski & Blagica Petreski, 2015. "Dissatisfied, feeling unequal and inclined to emigrate: Perceptions from Macedonia in a MIMIC model," Migration Letters, Transnational Press London, UK, vol. 12(3), pages 300-314, September.
    9. McDonald, James Ted & Worswick, Christopher, 2012. "The migration decisions of physicians in Canada: The roles of immigrant status and spousal characteristics," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 75(9), pages 1581-1588.
    10. Rabe, Birgitta, 2006. "Dual-earner migration in Britain: earnings gains, employment, and self-selection," ISER Working Paper Series 2006-01, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    11. M. L. Blackburn, 2010. "The Impact of Internal Migration on Married Couples' Earnings in Britain," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 77(307), pages 584-603, July.

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