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International Migration of Couples

  • Martin Junge

    ()

    (DEA (Danish Business Research Academy))

  • Martin D. Munk

    ()

    (Aalborg University)

  • Panu Poutvaara

    ()

    (University of Munich, Ifo Institute, CESifo and IZA, CReAM)

We present theory and evidence on international migration of couples. Our main question is how migration decisions depend on partners’ education and earnings, and the number of children. We use register data on full Danish population from 1982 to 2010, focusing on opposite-gender couples in which the female is aged 23 to 37, and the male 25 to 39. We find that power couples in which both are highly educated are most likely to emigrate, but also most likely to return. The probability of emigration is increasing in male earnings, but does not depend much on female earnings.

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File URL: http://www.norface-migration.org/publ_uploads/NDP_18_13.pdf
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Paper provided by Norface Research Programme on Migration, Department of Economics, University College London in its series Norface Discussion Paper Series with number 2013018.

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Date of creation: Jul 2013
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Handle: RePEc:nor:wpaper:2013018
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