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The Selection of High-Skilled Emigrants

Author

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  • Parey, Matthias
  • Ruhose, Jens
  • Waldinger, Fabian
  • Netz, Nicolai

Abstract

We measure selection among high-skilled emigrants from Germany using predicted earnings. Migrants to less equal countries are positively selected relative to nonmigrants, while migrants to more equal countries are negatively selected, consistent with the prediction in Borjas (1987). Positive selection to less equal countries reflects university quality and grades, and negative selection to more equal countries reflects university subject and gender. Migrants to the United States are highly positively selected and concentrated in STEM fields. Our results highlight the relevance of the Borjas model for high-skilled individuals when credit constraints and other migration barriers are unlikely to be binding.

Suggested Citation

  • Parey, Matthias & Ruhose, Jens & Waldinger, Fabian & Netz, Nicolai, 2017. "The Selection of High-Skilled Emigrants," Munich Reprints in Economics 68901, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:lmu:muenar:68901
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers

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