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Housing Tenure and Geographical Mobility in Belgium

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  • D. ISEBAERT

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Abstract

Housing tenure is a key determinant of geographical mobility. We estimate several probit models to explain the probability that households move, using Belgian longitudinal PSBH and EU-SILC datasets which together cover the period 1994-2009. We confirm the general conclusion in previous literature, that homeowners are, ceteris paribus, less mobile than tenants. Within the first category, having a mortgage further hampers mobility. Earlier results for Belgium did not find a significant difference between outright owners and mortgagees. Furthermore, we make progress on the existing literature by paying particular attention to (and dealing with) methodological issues such as unobserved heterogeneity and state dependence. However, we also obtain some indications that the strict exogeneity assumption may be violated, implying that we cannot exclude the possibility of some bias in our estimated coefficients.

Suggested Citation

  • D. Isebaert, 2013. "Housing Tenure and Geographical Mobility in Belgium," Working Papers of Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, Ghent University, Belgium 13/855, Ghent University, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration.
  • Handle: RePEc:rug:rugwps:13/855
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    File URL: http://wps-feb.ugent.be/Papers/wp_13_855.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Gaetano Lisi, 2016. "Mortgage Market, Housing Tenure Choice and Unemployment," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 53(4), pages 472-493, November.
    2. Stijn Baert & Freddy Heylen & Daan Isebaert, 2014. "Does Homeownership Lead to Longer Unemployment Spells? The Role of Mortgage Payments," De Economist, Springer, vol. 162(3), pages 263-286, September.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Housing tenure; geographical mobility; Belgian households; panel data;

    JEL classification:

    • R21 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Housing Demand
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population

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