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Granger causality in dynamic binary short panel data models

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  • Bartolucci, Francesco
  • Pigini, Claudia

Abstract

Strict exogeneity of covariates other than the lagged dependent variable, and conditional on unobserved heterogeneity, is often required for consistent estimation of binary panel data models. This assumption is likely to be violated in practice because of feedback effects from the past of the outcome variable on the present value of covariates and no general solution is yet available. In this paper, we provide the conditions for a logit model formulation that takes into account feedback effects without specifying a joint parametric model for the outcome and predetermined explanatory variables. Our formulation is based on the equivalence between Granger's definition of noncausality and a modification of the Sims' strict exogeneity assumption for nonlinear panel data models, introduced by Chamberlain1982 and for which we provide a more general theorem. We further propose estimating the model parameters with a recent fixed-effects approach based on pseudo conditional inference, adapted to the present case, thereby taking care of the correlation between individual permanent unobserved heterogeneity and the model's covariates as well. Our results hold for short panels with a large number of cross-section units, a case of great interest in microeconomic applications.

Suggested Citation

  • Bartolucci, Francesco & Pigini, Claudia, 2017. "Granger causality in dynamic binary short panel data models," MPRA Paper 77486, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:77486
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    fixed effects; noncausality; predetermined covariates; pseudo-conditional inference; strict exogeneity;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C12 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Hypothesis Testing: General
    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • C25 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Discrete Regression and Qualitative Choice Models; Discrete Regressors; Proportions; Probabilities

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