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Commuting, Migration and Local Joblessness

Author

Listed:
  • Michael Amior
  • Alan Manning

Abstract

Britain suffers from persistent spatial disparities in employment rates. This paper develops an integrated framework for analyzing two forces expected to equalize economic opportunity across areas: commuting and migration. Our framework is applicable to any level of spatial aggregation, and we use it to assess their contribution to labor market adjustment across British wards (or neighborhoods). Commuting offers only limited insurance against local shocks, because commutes are typically short and shocks are heavily correlated spatially. Analogously, migration fails to fully equalize opportunity because of strong temporal correlation in local demand shocks.

Suggested Citation

  • Michael Amior & Alan Manning, 2019. "Commuting, Migration and Local Joblessness," CEP Discussion Papers dp1623, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  • Handle: RePEc:cep:cepdps:dp1623
    as

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    File URL: http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/dp1623.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Jaeger, David A & Ruist, Joakim & Stuhler, Jan, 2018. "Shift-Share Instruments and the Impact of Immigration," CEPR Discussion Papers 12701, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. Alan Manning & Barbara Petrongolo, 2017. "How Local Are Labor Markets? Evidence from a Spatial Job Search Model," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 107(10), pages 2877-2907, October.
    3. Martyn Andrews & Ken Clark & William Whittaker, 2011. "The determinants of regional migration in Great Britain: a duration approach," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 174(1), pages 127-153, January.
    4. Timothy J. Bartik, 1991. "Who Benefits from State and Local Economic Development Policies?," Books from Upjohn Press, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, number wbsle.
    5. repec:oup:jecgeo:v:19:y:2019:i:2:p:335-372. is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Robert C. M. Beyer & Frank Smets, 2015. "Editor'S Choice Labour market adjustments and migration in Europe and the United States: how different?," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 30(84), pages 643-682.
    7. Daniel F Heuermann & Johannes F Schmieder, 2019. "The effect of infrastructure on worker mobility: evidence from high-speed rail expansion in Germany," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 19(2), pages 335-372.
    8. Elisa Guglielminetti & Rafael Lalive & Philippe Ruh & Etienne Wasmer, 2015. "Spatial search strategies of job seekers and the role of unemployment insurance," Sciences Po publications info:hdl:2441/4n249fe9fu9, Sciences Po.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Commuting, Migration and Local Joblessness
      by maximorossi in NEP-LTV blog on 2019-08-22 20:29:10

    More about this item

    Keywords

    spatial inequality; commuting; migration;

    JEL classification:

    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population

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