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Regional Labor Market Adjustment in the United States: Trend and Cycle

Author

Listed:
  • Mai Dao

    (International Monetary Fund)

  • Davide Furceri

    (International Monetary Fund)

  • Prakash Loungani

    (International Monetary Fund)

Abstract

We present new evidence on the evolution of labor mobility in the United States over the past four decades. Building on the seminal methodology by Blanchard and Katz (1992), combined with multiple sources of regional population and migration data, we show that interstate mobility in response to relative labor demand conditions is not as high as previously established and has been weakening since the early 1990s. In addition, we find that mobility is countercyclical: net migration across regions responds more strongly to spatial disparities in recessions than in normal times. While the declining trend in mobility has been driven by weaker out-migration from states experiencing negative relative shocks, the mobility surge in recessions is mostly accounted for by temporarily stronger in-migration to better-performing states.

Suggested Citation

  • Mai Dao & Davide Furceri & Prakash Loungani, 2017. "Regional Labor Market Adjustment in the United States: Trend and Cycle," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 99(2), pages 243-257, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:tpr:restat:v:99:y:2017:i:2:p:243-257
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Michael Amior & Alan Manning, 2015. "The Persistence of Local Joblessness," CEP Discussion Papers dp1357, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    2. Katharine G. Abraham & Melissa S. Kearney, 2018. "Explaining the Decline in the U.S. Employment-to-Population Ratio: A Review of the Evidence," NBER Working Papers 24333, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Benjamin A. Austin & Edward L. Glaeser & Lawrence H. Summers, 2018. "Jobs for the Heartland: Place-Based Policies in 21st Century America," NBER Working Papers 24548, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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