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New Directions for Residential Mobility Research: Linking Lives through Time and Space

Author

Listed:
  • Coulter, Rory

    () (University of Cambridge)

  • van Ham, Maarten

    () (Delft University of Technology)

  • Findlay, Allan M.

    () (University of St. Andrews)

Abstract

While researchers are increasingly reconceptualising international migration, less interest is being shown in rethinking the geographies of short-distance residential mobility and immobility. Short-distance moves are crucial for the structuration of everyday life, the operation of housing and labour markets and the (re)production of social inequalities. This paper argues that a deeper understanding of residential mobility and immobility can be gained by exploring developments in longitudinal analysis while seeking theoretical innovations derived from extending life course theories. Rethinking the geographies of residential mobility around notions of 'linked lives' will allow us to understand, critique and address major contemporary challenges.

Suggested Citation

  • Coulter, Rory & van Ham, Maarten & Findlay, Allan M., 2013. "New Directions for Residential Mobility Research: Linking Lives through Time and Space," IZA Discussion Papers 7525, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp7525
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    biography; life course; linked lives; longitudinal analysis; relationality; residential mobility;

    JEL classification:

    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population

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