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Moving to a job: The role of home equity, debt, and access to credit

  • Yuliya Demyanyk
  • Dmytro Hryshko
  • María José Luengo Luengo-Prado
  • Bent E. Sorensen

Using credit report data from two of the three major credit bureaus in the United States, we infer with high certainty whether households move to other labor markets defined by metropolitan areas. We estimate how moving patterns relate to labor market conditions, personal credit, and homeownership using panel regressions with fixed effects which control for all constant individual-specific traits. We interpret the patterns through simulations of a dynamic model of consumption, housing, and location choice. We find that homeowners with negative home equity move more than other homeowners, in particular when local unemployment growth is high overall, negative home equity is not an important barrier to labor mobility.

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Paper provided by Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland in its series Working Paper with number 1305.

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Date of creation: 2013
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Handle: RePEc:fip:fedcwp:1305
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  1. Munch, Jakob R. & Rosholm, Michael & Svarer, Michael, 2003. "Are Home Owners Really More Unemployed?," IZA Discussion Papers 872, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Hryshko, Dmytro & Luengo-Prado, Maria & Sorensen, Bent, 2010. "House Prices and Risk Sharing," Working Papers 2010-16, University of Alberta, Department of Economics.
  3. Michael Amior & Jonathan Halket, 2014. "Do households use home‐ownership to insure themselves? Evidence across U.S. cities," Quantitative Economics, Econometric Society, vol. 5(3), pages 631-674, November.
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  6. Sam Schulhofer-Wohl, 2010. "Negative equity does not reduce homeowners' mobility," Working Papers 682, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
  7. Christian Bayer & Falko Juessen, 2012. "On the Dynamics of Interstate Migration: Migration Costs and Self-Selection," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 15(3), pages 377-401, July.
  8. Vincent Sterk, 2010. "Home Equity, Mobility, and Macroeconomic Fluctuations," DNB Working Papers 265, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.
  9. Díaz, Antonia & Luengo Prado, Maria José, 2006. "On the user cost and homeownership," UC3M Working papers. Economics we065421, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Departamento de Economía.
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  12. Greg Kaplan & Sam Schulhofer-Wohl, 2012. "Understanding the Long-Run Decline in Interstate Migration," NBER Working Papers 18507, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  13. Henry S. Farber, 2012. "Unemployment in the Great Recession: Did the Housing Market Crisis Prevent the Unemployed from Moving to Take Jobs?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 102(3), pages 520-25, May.
  14. Harding, John P. & Rosenthal, Stuart S. & Sirmans, C.F., 2007. "Depreciation of housing capital, maintenance, and house price inflation: Estimates from a repeat sales model," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(2), pages 193-217, March.
  15. Andra C. Ghent & Marianna Kudlyak, 2011. "Recourse and Residential Mortgage Default: Evidence from US States 1," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 24(9), pages 3139-3186.
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