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Contextualised Mobility Histories of Moving Desires and Actual Moving Behaviour

Author

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  • Coulter, Rory

    () (University of Cambridge)

  • van Ham, Maarten

    () (Delft University of Technology)

Abstract

Conceptually, adopting a life course approach when analysing residential mobility enables us to investigate how experiencing particular life events affects mobility decision-making and behaviour throughout individual lifetimes. Yet although a growing body of longitudinal research links mobility decision-making to subsequent moving behaviour, most studies focus solely upon examining year-to-year transitions. As a result of this 'snap-shot' approach, little is known about how pre-move thoughts and subsequent mobility relate over longer periods within the context of dynamic life course trajectories. Current research therefore fails to distinguish ephemeral moving desires from those which are persistently expressed. This study is one of the first to move beyond investigating year-to-year transitions to explore the long term sequencing of moving desires and mobility behaviour within individual life courses. Using innovative techniques to visualise the sequences of a panel of British Household Panel Survey respondents, the study demonstrates that the meanings and significance of particular transitions in moving desires and mobility behaviour become apparent only when these transitions are arranged into individual mobility histories. We uncover previously ignored groups of individuals persistently unable to act in accordance with their moving desires. Visualising mobility histories also highlights the oft-neglected importance of residential stability over the life course.

Suggested Citation

  • Coulter, Rory & van Ham, Maarten, 2011. "Contextualised Mobility Histories of Moving Desires and Actual Moving Behaviour," IZA Discussion Papers 6146, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp6146
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Nancy Landale & Avery Guest, 1985. "Constraints, Satisfaction and Residential Mobility: Speare’s Model Reconsidered," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 22(2), pages 199-222, May.
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    4. Christian Brzinsky-Fay & Ulrich Kohler & Magdalena Luniak, 2006. "Sequence analysis with Stata," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 6(4), pages 435-460, December.
    5. Francesca Michielin & Clara H Mulder, 2008. "Family events and the residential mobility of couples," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 40(11), pages 2770-2790, November.
    6. Adrian J Bailey & Megan K Blake & Thomas J Cooke, 2004. "Migration, care, and the linked lives of dual-earner households," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 36(9), pages 1617-1632, September.
    7. Philip S Morrison & William A V Clark, 2011. "Internal migration and employment: macro flows and micro motives," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 43(8), pages 1948-1964, August.
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    9. Boheim, Rene & Taylor, Mark P, 2002. "Tied Down or Rome to Move? Investigating the Relationships between Housing Tenure, Employment Status and Residential Mobility in Britain," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 49(4), pages 369-392, September.
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    11. Coulter, Rory & van Ham, Maarten & Feijten, Peteke, 2011. "Partner (Dis)agreement on Moving Desires and the Subsequent Moving Behaviour of Couples," IZA Discussion Papers 5612, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    12. Carola de Groot & Clara H Mulder & Marjolijn Das & Dorien Manting, 2011. "Life events and the gap between intention to move and actual mobility," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 43(1), pages 48-66, January.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    longitudinal data; residential mobility; life course; moving desires; sequence analysis;

    JEL classification:

    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population

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