IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/koc/wpaper/1103.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Brain Drain from Turkey: Return Intentions of Skilled Migrants

Author

Listed:
  • Nil Demet Güngör

    () (Atýlým University)

  • Aysit Tansel

    () (Middle East Technical University and Economic Research Forum (ERF) Cairo, Egypt)

Abstract

The study estimates an empirical model of return intentions using a dataset compiled from an internet survey of Turkish professionals residing abroad. In the migration literature, wage differentials are often cited as an important factor explaining skilled migration. The findings of our study suggest, however, that non-pecuniary factors, such as the importance of family and social considerations, are also influential in the return or non-return decision of the highly educated. In addition, economic instability in Turkey, prior intentions to stay abroad and work experience in Turkey also increase non-return. Female respondents also appear less likely to return indicating a more selective migration process for females.

Suggested Citation

  • Nil Demet Güngör & Aysit Tansel, 2011. "Brain Drain from Turkey: Return Intentions of Skilled Migrants," Koç University-TUSIAD Economic Research Forum Working Papers 1103, Koc University-TUSIAD Economic Research Forum.
  • Handle: RePEc:koc:wpaper:1103
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://eaf.ku.edu.tr/sites/eaf.ku.edu.tr/files/erf_wp_1103.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Daniele Checchi & Gianfranco De Simone & Riccardo Faini, 2007. "Skilled Migration, FDI and Human Capital Investment," UNIMI - Research Papers in Economics, Business, and Statistics unimi-1067, Universitá degli Studi di Milano.
    2. Stark, Oded & Bloom, David E, 1985. "The New Economics of Labor Migration," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 75(2), pages 173-178, May.
    3. Kuhn, Peter J. & McAusland, Carol, 2006. "The International Migration of Knowledge Workers: When Is Brain Drain Beneficial?," IZA Discussion Papers 2493, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Faini, Riccardo, 2006. "Remittances and the Brain Drain," IZA Discussion Papers 2155, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Ernst P. Goss & Chris Paul, 1986. "Age and Work Experience in the Decision to Migrate," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 21(3), pages 397-405.
    6. Beine, Michel & Docquier, Frederic & Rapoport, Hillel, 2001. "Brain drain and economic growth: theory and evidence," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 64(1), pages 275-289, February.
    7. Agarwal, Vinod B. & Winkler, Donald R., 1985. "United States immigration policy and indirect immigration of professionals," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 4(1), pages 1-16, February.
    8. Schiff, Maurice, 2005. "Brain Gain: Claims about Its Size and Impact on Welfare and Growth Are Greatly Exaggerated," IZA Discussion Papers 1599, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    9. Stark, Oded & Helmenstein, Christian & Prskawetz, Alexia, 1998. "Human capital depletion, human capital formation, and migration: a blessing or a "curse"?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 60(3), pages 363-367, September.
    10. Docquier, Frédéric & Lowell, B. Lindsay & Marfouk, Abdeslam, 2007. "A Gendered Assessment of the Brain Drain," IZA Discussion Papers 3235, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    11. Michel Beine & Frédéric Docquier & Hillel Rapoport, 2002. "Brain Drain and LDCs' Growth: Winners and Losers," Working Papers 2002-08, Bar-Ilan University, Department of Economics.
    12. Bratsberg, Bernt, 1995. "The incidence of non-return among foreign students in the United States," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 14(4), pages 373-384, December.
    13. Nil Demet Güngör & Aysit Tansel, 2008. "Brain drain from Turkey: the case of professionals abroad," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 29(4), pages 323-347, July.
    14. Stark, Oded & Helmenstein, Christian & Prskawetz, Alexia, 1997. "A brain gain with a brain drain," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 55(2), pages 227-234, August.
    15. Aysit Tansel & Nil Demet Gungor, 2003. "Brain Drain from Turkey: Survey Evidence of Student Non-Return," Working Papers 0307, Economic Research Forum, revised 03 2003.
    16. Sylvain Dessy & Tiana Rambeloma, 2009. "Immigration Policy, Remittances, and Growth in the Migrant-Sending Country," Cahiers de recherche 0915, CIRPEE.
    17. Huang, Wei-Chiao, 1988. "An empirical analysis of foreign student brain drain to the United States," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 7(2), pages 231-243, April.
    18. Faini, Riccardo, 2003. "Is the Brain Drain an Unmitigated Blessing?," WIDER Working Paper Series 064, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    19. Dumont, Jean-Christophe & Martin, John P. & Spielvogel, Gilles, 2007. "Women on the Move: The Neglected Gender Dimension of the Brain Drain," IZA Discussion Papers 2920, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Ngoc Thi Minh Tran & Michael P. Cameron & Jacques Poot, 2018. "Return or Not Return? The Role of Home-Country Institutional Quality in Vietnamese Migrants’ Return Intentions," Working Papers in Economics 18/04, University of Waikato.
    2. Elveren, Adem Yavuz & Toksöz, Gülay, 2017. "Why Don’t Highly Skilled Women Want to Return? Turkey’s Brain Drain from a Gender Perspective," MPRA Paper 80290, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Grant Lewison & Philip Roe & Richard Webber & Richard Sullivan, 2016. "Lung cancer researchers, 2008–2013: their sex and ethnicity," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 106(1), pages 105-117, January.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Skilled migration; Brain drain; Return intentions; Turkey;

    JEL classification:

    • F20 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - General
    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:koc:wpaper:1103. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Sumru Oz). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/dekoctr.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.