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Why Migrate: for Study or for Work?

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  • Elise S. Brezis

    () (Bar-Ilan University)

Abstract

Over the past decades, globalization has led to a huge increase in the migration of workers, as well as students. This paper develops a simple two-step model that describes the decisions of an individual vis-à-vis education and migration, and presents a unified model, wherein the two migration decisions are combined into a single, unique model. This paper shows that under the plausible assumption that costs of migration differ over the human life cycle, the usual brain drain strategy is suboptimal. With an increase in globalization, the brain drain strategy will be replaced by the strategy of migration of students.

Suggested Citation

  • Elise S. Brezis, 2016. "Why Migrate: for Study or for Work?," Working Papers 2016-05, Bar-Ilan University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:biu:wpaper:2016-05
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Brain drain; Globalization; Higher education; Human capital; Migration; Mobility.;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • I23 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Higher Education; Research Institutions
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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