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The determinants of international mobility of students

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  • Michel Beine
  • Romain Noël
  • Lionel Ragot

Abstract

This paper analyzes the determinants of the choice of location of international students. Building on the documented trends in international migration of students, we develop a small theoretical model allowing to identify the various factors associated to the attraction of migrants as well as the costs of moving abroad. Using new data capturing the number of students from a large set of origin countries studying in a set of 13 OECD countries, weassess the importance of the various factors identified in the theory. We find support for a significant network effect in the migration of students, a result so far undocumented in the literature. We also find a significant role for cost factors such as housing prices and for attractiveness variables such as the reported quality of universities. In contrast, we do not find an important role for registration fees.

Suggested Citation

  • Michel Beine & Romain Noël & Lionel Ragot, 2013. "The determinants of international mobility of students," EconomiX Working Papers 2013-26, University of Paris Nanterre, EconomiX.
  • Handle: RePEc:drm:wpaper:2013-26
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Student mobility; network effect; migration costs; higher education policy.;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

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