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Determinants of the Regional Demand for Higher Education in The Netherlands: A Gravity Model Approach


  • Carla Sa
  • Raymond Florax
  • Piet Rietveld


Sa C., Florax R. J. G. M. and Rietveld P. (2004) Determinants of the regional demand for higher education in The Netherlands: a gravity model approach, Reg. Studies 38, 375-392. Studies on the determinants of the demand for higher education typically emphasize the relevance of socio-economic factors, but leave the spatial dimensions of the prospective students' university choices largely unexplored. In this study, we investigate the determinants of university entrance for Dutch high school graduates in 2000, and pay particular attention to the attractiveness of the university, both in terms of its accessibility and the educational quality of its programme. We combine cross-section data on the region of origin of the high school graduate and the university destination region for first-year students with regional and university characteristics in a production- constrained gravity model. The main finding of the study is that the behaviour of prospective students is governed by a distance deterrence effect and a downward rent effect, but a positive impact results from regional/urban amenities rather than from the educational quality of the university programmes.

Suggested Citation

  • Carla Sa & Raymond Florax & Piet Rietveld, 2004. "Determinants of the Regional Demand for Higher Education in The Netherlands: A Gravity Model Approach," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(4), pages 375-392.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:regstd:v:38:y:2004:i:4:p:375-392 DOI: 10.1080/03434002000213905

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    Cited by:

    1. Michel Beine & Romain Noël & Lionel Ragot, 2012. "The Determinants of International Mobility of Students," CESifo Working Paper Series 3848, CESifo Group Munich.
    2. Cattaneo, Mattia & Malighetti, Paolo & Paleari, Stefano & Redondi, Renato, 2016. "The role of the air transport service in interregional long-distance students’ mobility in Italy," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 93(C), pages 66-82.
    3. Mabel Sanchez-Barrioluengo & Sara Flisi, 2017. "Student Mobility in Tertiary Education: institutional factors and regional attractiveness," JRC Working Papers JRC108895, Joint Research Centre (Seville site).
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    5. Bauer, Philipp C. & Riphahn, Regina T., 2005. "Heterogenity in the Intergenerational Transmission of Educational Attainment: Evidence from Switzerland on Natives and Second," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers 38, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
    6. Miguel Portela & Nelson Areal & Carla Sá & Fernando Alexandre & João Cerjeira & Ana Carvalho & Artur Rodrigues, 2007. "Regulation and marketisation in the Portuguese higher education system," NIPE Working Papers 11/2007, NIPE - Universidade do Minho.
    7. Philipp Bauer & Regina Riphahn, 2007. "Heterogeneity in the intergenerational transmission of educational attainment: evidence from Switzerland on natives and second-generation immigrants," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 20(1), pages 121-148, February.
    8. Carla Sá & Raymond Florax & Piet Rietveld, 2007. "Living-arrangement and university decisions of Dutch young adults," NIPE Working Papers 14/2007, NIPE - Universidade do Minho.
    9. Bruckmeier Kerstin & Fischer Georg-Benedikt & Wigger Berthold U., 2015. "Studiengebühren in Deutschland: Lehren aus einem gescheiterten Experiment," Perspektiven der Wirtschaftspolitik, De Gruyter, vol. 16(3), pages 289-301, October.
    10. Frank Cörvers & Hans Heijke & Daniëlle Bertrand-Cloodt & Jesper van Thor, 2010. "The impact of distance deterrence on the choice of field of study in vocational education in The Netherlands," Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación volume 5,in: María Jesús Mancebón-Torrubia & Domingo P. Ximénez-de-Embún & José María Gómez-Sancho & Gregorio Gim (ed.), Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación 5, edition 1, volume 5, chapter 31, pages 605-624 Asociación de Economía de la Educación.
    11. Vera Rocha & Mirjam van Praag & Anabela Carneiro, 2015. "Deviating from the benchmarks: Human capital inputs and the survival of new startups," CEF.UP Working Papers 1502, Universidade do Porto, Faculdade de Economia do Porto.
    12. Evert Meijers, 2005. "High-level consumer services in polycentric urban regions - hospital care and higher education between duplication and complementarity," ERSA conference papers ersa05p208, European Regional Science Association.
    13. Alm, James & Winters, John V., 2009. "Distance and intrastate college student migration," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 28(6), pages 728-738, December.
    14. Malik Fahim Bashir & Changsheng Xu & Khalid Zaman & Ghulam Akhmat, 2014. "Key Factors Determining the Rationale for Brain Drain: An Irony Never Recovered," International Journal of Economics and Empirical Research (IJEER), The Economics and Social Development Organization (TESDO), vol. 2(8), pages 308-320, August.
    15. Ugo Fratesi, 2014. "Editorial: The Mobility of High-Skilled Workers - Causes and Consequences," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 48(10), pages 1587-1591, October.
    16. Nicola Francesco Dotti & Ugo Fratesi & Camilla Lenzi & Marco Percoco, 2014. "Local labour market conditions and the spatial mobility of science and technology university students: evidence from Italy," Review of Regional Research: Jahrbuch für Regionalwissenschaft, Springer;Gesellschaft für Regionalforschung (GfR), vol. 34(2), pages 119-137, October.
    17. Peter Berck & Sofia Tano & Olle Westerlund, 2016. "Regional Sorting of Human Capital: The Choice of Location among Young Adults in Sweden," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 50(5), pages 757-770, May.
    18. Herbst, Mikolaj & Rok, Jakub, 2013. "Mobility of human capital and its effect on regional economic development. Review of theory and empirical literature," MPRA Paper 45755, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    19. Beine, Michel & Noël, Romain & Ragot, Lionel, 2014. "Determinants of the international mobility of students," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 40-54.
    20. Carlos Vieira & Isabel Vieira, 2011. "Determinants and projections of demand for higher education in Portugal," CEFAGE-UE Working Papers 2011_15, University of Evora, CEFAGE-UE (Portugal).
    21. Tuomo Suhonen, 2012. "The role of distances and parents’ educational background in university field of study choice," ERSA conference papers ersa12p751, European Regional Science Association.
    22. Rocha, Vera & van Praag, Mirjam C. & Folta, Timothy B. & Carneiro, Anabela, 2016. "Entrepreneurial Choices of Initial Human Capital Endowments and New Venture Success," IZA Discussion Papers 9919, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    23. Mattia Cattaneo & Paolo Malighetti & Stefano Paleari & Renato Redondi, 2015. "Evolution of long distance students? mobility: the role of transport infrastructures in Italy," ERSA conference papers ersa15p1231, European Regional Science Association.


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