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Foreign Students in U.S. Doctoral Programs

Author

Listed:
  • Nahid Aslanbeigui
  • Veronica Montecinos

Abstract

In 1996, foreigners represented over half of the doctoral student population in economics, up from 20 percent in 1972. This article presents a profile of foreign students in economics Ph.D. programs in the United States based on survey and interview data collected in 1996. In addition to exploring students' assessment of their education, interests and career plans, the authors offer explanations for the rising proportion of foreign students, explore the implications of this phenomenon, and suggest the need for further research on the teaching of economics and the practice of the profession, both in the United States and abroad.

Suggested Citation

  • Nahid Aslanbeigui & Veronica Montecinos, 1998. "Foreign Students in U.S. Doctoral Programs," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 12(3), pages 171-182, Summer.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:jecper:v:12:y:1998:i:3:p:171-82
    Note: DOI: 10.1257/jep.12.3.171
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    File URL: http://www.aeaweb.org/articles.php?doi=10.1257/jep.12.3.171
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Colander, David, 2003. "The Aging of an Economist," Journal of the History of Economic Thought, Cambridge University Press, vol. 25(02), pages 157-176, June.
    2. Markoff, John & Montecinos, Verónica, 1993. "The Ubiquitous Rise of Economists," Journal of Public Policy, Cambridge University Press, vol. 13(01), pages 37-68, January.
    3. Krueger, Anne O, et al, 1991. "Report of the Commission on Graduate Education in Economics," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 29(3), pages 1035-1053, September.
    4. Fine, J-C, 1997. "An African Based Doctoral Programme in Economics : Summary Report," Papers 26s, African Economic Research Consortium.
    5. Harberger, Arnold C, 1993. "Secrets of Success: A Handful of Heroes," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(2), pages 343-350, May.
    6. Bruno S. Frey & Reiner Eichenberger, 1993. "American and European Economics and Economists," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 7(4), pages 185-193, Fall.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Michel Beine & Romain Noël & Lionel Ragot, 2012. "The Determinants of International Mobility of Students," CESifo Working Paper Series 3848, CESifo Group Munich.
    2. Antonio Spilimbergo, 2009. "Democracy and Foreign Education," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 99(1), pages 528-543, March.
    3. Paula Stephan & Chiara Franzoni & Giuseppe Scellato, 2013. "Choice of Country by the Foreign Born for PhD and Postdoctoral Study: A Sixteen-Country Perspective," NBER Working Papers 18809, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. David Colander, 2005. "The Making of an Economist Redux," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 19(1), pages 175-198, Winter.
    5. David Colander, 2004. "The Making of an Economist II," Middlebury College Working Paper Series 0420, Middlebury College, Department of Economics.
    6. Chellaraj, Gnanaraj & Maskus, Keith E. & Mattoo, Aaditya, 2005. "The contribution of skilled immigration and international graduate students to U.S. innovation," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3588, The World Bank.
    7. Fouarge D. & Özer M.N., 2014. "International mobility of students – Its impact on labour market forecasts and its contribution to the Dutch economy," ROA Technical Report 006, Maastricht University, Research Centre for Education and the Labour Market (ROA).
    8. Tomasz Gajderowicz & Gabriela Grotkowska & Leszek Wincenciak, 2012. "Does Students\’ International Mobility Increase Their Employability?," Ekonomia journal, Faculty of Economic Sciences, University of Warsaw, vol. 30.
    9. Ivo Maes & Erik Buyst, 2005. "Migration and Americanization: The special case of Belgian economics," The European Journal of the History of Economic Thought, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(1), pages 73-88.
    10. Malik Fahim Bashir & Changsheng Xu & Khalid Zaman & Ghulam Akhmat, 2014. "Key Factors Determining the Rationale for Brain Drain: An Irony Never Recovered," International Journal of Economics and Empirical Research (IJEER), The Economics and Social Development Organization (TESDO), vol. 2(8), pages 308-320, August.
    11. Craig A. Depken II & Johnny Ducking & Peter A. Groothuis, 2015. "Career Duration in the NHL: Bias against Europeans?," Working Papers 15-09, Department of Economics, Appalachian State University.
    12. Craig A. Depken & Johnny Ducking & Peter A. Groothuis, 2017. "Career duration in the NHL: pushing and pulling on Europeans?," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(59), pages 5923-5934, December.
    13. Beine, Michel & Noël, Romain & Ragot, Lionel, 2014. "Determinants of the international mobility of students," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 40-54.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • A14 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - Sociology of Economics
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education

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